Browsing Tag

Latino Theater Company

Entertainment News

Latino Theater Company announces ‘Encuentro de las Américas’ 14 theater companies from across the Americas, one vibrant celebration in the heart of downtown Los Angeles

L.A.’s Latino Theater Company will be joined by 13 companies from the U.S., Canada, Mexico, Cuba, Peru and Colombia for a three-week celebration of dynamic, contemporary Latinx and Latin American theater. Encuentro de Las Américasproduced by the Latino Theater Company in association with Latinx Theatre Commons, is set to take place at downtown’s The Los Angeles Theatre Center from Nov. 2 through Nov. 19.

 

The 14 companies will present their work in repertory, with performances running simultaneously every Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday in the five spaces that make up The LATC’s multi-theater complex. The companies include 24th Street Theatre from Los Angeles, CAArgos Teatro from Havana,CubaCara Mía Theater Company from Dallas, TXCompañía Nacional de las Artes from BogotáColombiaCulture Clash from Los AngelesCAÉbano Teatro from LimaPeruEnsemble Studio Theatre/LA from Los Angeles, CAGuadalupe Cultural Arts Center from San AntonioTXLatino Theater Company from Los AngelesCAMarga Gomez from San FranciscoCANightswimmingfrom Toronto, ONCanadaOrganización Secreta Teatro, from Mexico CityMexicoPregones Theaterfrom BronxNY; and Vueltas Bravas from BogotáColombia.

 

An additional 12 Los Angeles-based artists will be represented in Patas Arriba (“Upside Down”), a late night “micro-theater festival” set to take place in the “belly” of The LATC, where audiences will cycle through the non-traditional performance spaces of the building — Vault, Sub Lobby, Green Room and Tunnel — to experience four 15-minute works during each hour-long performance. Patas Arriba will take place every Thursday, Friday and Saturday, with two staggered start times (9:30 p.m. and 9:50 p.m.) and a different line-up of four plays each week.

 

A free Cinema & Music mini-festival on Tuesday and Wednesday nights will pair musical performances with screenings of soon-to be-released films, including Chavelaa new documentary about Costa Rican-Mexican singer Chavela Vargas and NALIP, an evening of short films followed by a concert by Spanish singer Patricia Kraus in her American debut.

 

Finally, the 26 companies will work together to share creative methodologies that will culminate in the co-creation of five new works presented on the last day of the festival. This unique collaboration offers participants an in-depth opportunity to mesh aesthetic diversity of Latinx and Latin American work, thus furthering the mission of the festival to create a global theater community.

 

“That’s what makes our Encuentro so unique, so different from any festival here or anywhere else in the world,”

 

says Latino Theater Company artistic director José Luis Valenzuela.

 

“It’s about artists working together and creating new work.”

 

According to Valenzuela, Encuentro de Las Américas is a natural extension of the national Encuentro presented by LTC three years ago.

 

“In 2014, we explored the relationship of American Latinos to the rest of the theater landscape in the U.S.,”

 

he explains.

 

“The question this time, with artists participating not only from this country, but from Canada, Latin and South America, and the Caribbean, is how can American Latinx and Latin American theater-makers have a conversation? Where are we going? How do we jointly embrace our voice?”

 

The Latino Theater Company is dedicated to providing a world-class arts center for those pursuing artistic excellence; a laboratory where both tradition and innovation are honored and honed; and a place where the convergence of people, cultures and ideas contribute to the future. Now in its 31st year, LTC has operated The Los Angeles Theatre Center, a facility of the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs and a landmark building in Downtown’s Historic Core, since 2006.

 

 

Encuentro de las Américas takes place from Nov. 2 through Nov. 19. Single tickets are $22 for students, seniors and vets and $44 general admission. Discounts are available for 2-play, 6-play and 13-play packages. Tickets to the Patas Arriba micro-theater festival are $20. Tickets to the Cinema & Music mini-festival are freeTheLos Angeles Theatre Center is located at 514 S. SpringSt., Los AngelesCA 90013. For more information and to purchase tickets, call (866811-4111 or go to www.thelatc.org.

 

 

Detailed descriptions and scheduling:
Encuentro de Las Américas

 

WHAT:
Encuentro de Las Américas
 — Fourteen companies from the U.S. Canada, Mexico, Cuba, Peru and Colombia  celebrate dynamic, contemporary Latinx and Latin American theater during a three-week festival, with five performances presented simultaneously every Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday in the five performance spaces that make up The Los Angeles Theatre Center. An additional 12 Los Angeles-based artists will be represented in Patas Arriba (“Upside Down”), a late night “micro-theater festival” set to take place in the “belly” of The LATC, where audiences will cycle through the non-traditional performance spaces of the building — Vault, Sub Lobby, Green Room and Tunnel — to experience four 15-minute works during each hour-long performance. A free Cinema & Music mini-festival on Tuesday and Wednesday nights will pair musical performances with screenings of soon-to be-released films, including Chavela, a new documentary about Costa Rican-Mexican singer Chavela Vargas and NALIP, an evening of short films followed by a concert by Spanish singer Patricia Kraus in her American debut. Produced by the Latino Theater Company in association with Latinx Theatre Commons.

 

WHO:
24th Street Theatre, Los AngelesCA
♦ La Razón Blindada
 (“Armored Reason”)written and directed by Arístides Vargas — In this sublimely witty and provocative play, two political prisoners are allowed to interact with one another for one hour each week. Confined to their chairs and never allowed to stand, they entertain each other with stories of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza as we witness the power of theater to transport them. Triply inspired by the classic novel “El Quixote” by Cervantes, “The Truth About Sancho Panza” by Franz Kafka, and testimonies from Chicho Vargas and other political prisoners held in Rawson Prison during Argentina’s “Dirty War” of the 1970s. A Los Angeles Times “Critic’s Choice” and winner of the 2011 LA Weekly “Production of the Year” award, this 24th Street production has toured around the U.S. as well as to Mexico City, Culiacán, Baja Mexico, San Salvador, Colombia and Ecuador. (Performed in Spanish with English supertitles)

 

La Razón Blindada
(“The Armored Reason”)
24th Street Theatre
Los Angeles, CA
Photo by Juan Tallo

 

 

Argos TeatroHavana, Cuba
♦ 10 Million / 10 Millones, written and directed by Carlos Celdrán — Cuba, 1970s and ‘80s. A young man comes of age during the tumultuous aftermath of Fidel Castro’s revolution. Torn between the ideals of his communist mother and his alienated middle-class father, he seeks to find his own way in a world turned upside down by history. Winner of the Cuban National Theater Award 2016 and awarded the Cuban Critic Award 2017. (Performed in Spanish with English supertitles)

 

10 Million Argos Teatro Havana, Cuba Photo by Manolo Garriga

 

 

Cara Mía Theater CompanyDallas, TX
♦ Deferred Action by David Lozano and Lee Trulldirected by David Lozano — Javier Mejía arrived in the U.S. as an undocumented minor. Now, years later, he finds himself caught in the tangle of existing immigration laws, new presidential policies and the harsh reality of living in the shadows. Deferred Action follows the lives, loopholes and dangers of those who dare to dream. (Performed in English and Spanish, with Spanish and English supertitles)

 

Deferred Action
Cara Mia Theater Company
Dallas, TX
Photo by Karen Almond

 

 

Compañía Nacional de las ArtesBogotáColombia
♦ Las mariposas saltan al vacío (“The Butterflies jump to the void”) by José Miliándirected by Jorge Cao —  In 1993, José Milián shook the Cuban theatrical scene when he premiered this work about living with AIDS. Shadowed by the presence of death, a motley group of institutionalized individuals debate about life, illness, tolerance, love, treason, loneliness, reality, dream and fantasy before presenting an improvised play for the other patients. (Performed in Spanish with English supertitles)

 

 

Las mariposas saltan al vacío saltan al vacío
(“The Butterflies jump to the void”)
Compañía Nacional de las Artes
Bogotá, Colombia
Photo courtesy of the artists

 
Culture Clash, Los AngelesCA
♦ Culture Clash: An American Odysseywritten by Richard MontoyaRic Salinas and Herbert Siguenza, directed byRobert Beltran — The Chicano kings of comedy perform 33 years worth of monologues and scenes from award-winning productions such as Radio Mambo, Nuyorican Stories, and Bordertown as well as an exclusive piece created just for Encuentro de las Américas. Along the way, we meet the unheard voices of the marginalized and give space to their truth. (Performed in English, Spanish and Caló with Spanish and English supertitles)

 

Ébano TeatroLimaPeru
 Ropa Intima (“Intimate Apparel”) by Lynn Nottage, directed by Haysen Percovich — Set in 1905 New York, Esther, a black seamstress, painstakingly crafts delicate undergarments for clientele ranging from young brides to wealthy matrons to ladies of the night. As Esther yearns to escape her life of drudgery and isolation, letters from a distant admirer in Panama offer the promise of love and a future. (Performed in Spanish with English supertitles)

Ropa Intima
Ébano Teatro
Lima, Peru
Photo courtesy of the artists

 

 

Ensemble Studio Theatre/LA, Los AngelesCA
♦ WET: A DACAmented Journey
written and performed by Alex Alpharaoh, directed by Kevin Comartin — Based on the playwright’s own experiences, Alex Alpharaoh’s acclaimed solo show tells the story of Anner Cividanis, an American in every sense of the word except one: on paper. Chronicling Anner’s life as an undocumented worker, WET: A DACAmented Journey captures the desperation of being a DREAMer in the U.S. (Performed in English with Spanish supertitles)

 

WET: A DACAmented Journey
Ensemble Studio Theatre/LA
Los Angeles, CA
Photo by Youthana Yuos

 

 

Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center, San AntonioTX
♦ Conjunto Blueswritten by Nicolás R. Valdez, directed by Ruben C. Gonzalez — Nicolas Valdez time travels seamlessly through button accordion riff and character as he shares a live-music history lesson of conjunto music as a form of cultural resistance and liberation from the campos to the cantinas. (Performed in English and Spanish with Spanish and English supertitles)

 

Conjunto Blues
Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center
San Antonio, TX
Photo courtesy of the artists

 

 

Latino Theater Company, Los AngelesCA
♦ Dementia by Evelina Fernández, directed by José Luis Valenzuela — Skeletons aren’t the only things that come out of the closet in this award-winning Latino swansong about the glamorous death of Moises (his friends call him Moe). Mortality never seemed so fabulous as he invites his closest friends over for a “going away for good party.” Demented fantasies abound as his alter ego, a torch singing drag queen, tempts him into his famous final scene. (Performed in English and Spanish with Spanish and English supertitles)

Dementia The Latino Theater Company Los Angeles, CA Photo by Christopher Ash

 

 

 

Marga GomezSan FranciscoCA
♦ Latin Standardswritten and performed by Marga Gomez, directed by David Schweizer — The adult child of a Cuban entertainer attempts to honor her macho immigrant dad by launching a hipster comedy night at the legendary San Francisco Latino drag club, Esta Noch. An energetic, funny and poignant story of perseverance and creative addiction passed down from immigrant father to lesbian daughter. (Performed in English with Spanish supertitles)

 

Nightswimming, Toronto, ONCanada
 Broken Tailbone, written and performed by Carmen Aguirre, directed by Brian Quirt — Carmen Aguirre leads a public Latin American dance lesson, woven together with hilarious and moving stories of her own experiences in the hidden world of dancehalls in Canada. DJ Don Pedro Chamale creates an irresistible musical environment to get even the most reluctant dancer up on their feet! Daring, sexy and above all, fun, each dance lesson flows into Carmen’s stories of intimacy, politics, culture and the forgotten origins of each dance. (Performed in English and Spanish with Spanish and English supertitles)

Broken Tailbone
Nightswimming
Toronto, ON, Canada
Photo courtesy of the artist

 

 

Organización Secreta TeatroMexico CityMexico
♦ Quemar las naves. El viaje de Emma (“Burning the ships: Emma’s Journey”) written and directed by Rocío Carrillo— A powerful and visually stunning feminist adaptation of Homer’s The Odyssey. Following the death of her husband, Emma embarks on a maritime journey in search of the meaning life. She and her ragtag crew of sailors, pirates, past loves and Greek gods face trials and challenges of mythical proportions. (Performed without words)

 

Quemar las naves. El viaje de Emma
(“Burning the ships: Emma’s Journey”)
Organización Secreta Teatro
Mexico City, Mexico
Photo by Luis Quiroz

 

 

 

Pregones TheaterBronxNY
♦ El Apagón /The Blackout, adapted for the stage by Alvan Colón-LespierJorge B. Merced and Rosalba Rolón, directed by Rosalba Rolón — While riding the New York subway uptown from Brooklyn to El Barrio, eager to witness the birth of his firstborn, a Puerto Rican factory worker and his best friend, Trompoloco are caught in the Great Northeastern Blackout of 1965. Acclaimed as “the quintessential ‘Boricua’ play,” the production is an adaptation of the short story “The Night We Became People Again” (“La noche en la que volvimos a ser gente”) by José Luis González, performed in Spanish and English, and set to the beat of popular Latin songs from the 1950s and ‘60s. (Performed in English and Spanish with Spanish and English supertitles)

 

El Apagón /The Blackout
Pregones Theatre
Bronx, NY
Photo by Marisol Díaz

 

 

Vueltas BravasBogotáColombia
♦ Miss Julia, a bilingual adaptation by J. Ed Araiza based on the play Miss Julie by August Strindberg, directed byLorenzo Montanini — Set in Colombia on Midsummer Eve, Miss Julia and her servant Juan have an encounter that will change their lives forever. As Juan tries to rise from the depths of his servile life, Miss Julia wants to escape the bonds that tie her to a meaningless upper-class existence. The result is a power play of love, lust and a battle of the classes which becomes violent and seemingly out of control. (Performed in Spanish and English with English and Spanish supertitles)

 

Miss Julia
Vueltas Bravas
Bogotá, Colombia
Photo by Federico Rios

 

 

Late night micro-theater festival 
♦ Patas Arriba
 (“Upside Down”): An L.A. Anthology, a late night “micro-theater festival” set to take place in the “belly” of The LATC, where audiences will cycle through the Vault, Sub Lobby, Green Room and Tunnel to experience four 15-minute works during each hour-long performance.

 

WEEK 1:
♦ Morir en Vida, choreographed and danced by Ela Aldrete — Human beings who risk their more valuable possession (their bodies, their lives) in search of a utopian life. (The Vault)
♦ Blood Match by Oliver Mayer — Amidst the heroin fields of Sinaloa, Mexico, three young people form a lover´s triangle in a world where life is cheap and poppies can make or break a man. (Sub-Lobby)
♦ Las García, written and performed by Gabriela Ortega — Two Dominican women of the same bloodline fight to find their true selves. (Green Room)
♦ Ka Ata Quilla by Milagros Lizarraga — The pre-Incan moon divinity of the Titicaca Lake, where the Incan culture began. (The Tunnel)

 

WEEK 2:
♦ Quetzal y Colibrí, written and performed by Alex Alpharaoh and Elisa Noemi (The Vault)
♦ Miss Honduras by Rickerby Hinds — the story of Maria Estela Gallardo. (Sub-Lobby)
♦ Aprender A Caer by Mick García and Cris-lan García — 10 seconds can feel like 10 minutes in which you see a whole life pass by. (Green Room)
♦ Samudrachoreographed by Beatriz Eugenia Vásquez — Inspired by the water issues the planet currently faces and the denial of global warming by some of our world leaders. (The Tunnel)

 

WEEK 3:
♦ Browner, Queerer, Louder, Prouder, written and performed by Monica Palacios — Speaks to our present divisive political and social climate. (The Vault)
♦ Manos Arriba by Mercedes Floresislas — When the guests fail to show up, Ramon needs help from the audience to show the Deaf Latinx pride. (Sub-Lobby)
♦ Queen of Califas by Israel Lopez and the Southland Company — Three drivers make their way through the California Highway system on a lonely Sunday evening. (Green Room)
♦ Jardín by Chicanas, Cholas Chisme — Dia De Los Muertos in Los Angeles: the night when our ancestors come back to visit. (The Tunnel)

 

Cinema & Music mini-festival (free)
♦ Chavela, directed by Catherine Gund and Daresha Kyi — An evocative, thought-provoking documentary about the iconoclastic, game-changing artist Chavela Vargas. Followed by a musical performance,
♦ NALIP — an evening of short films followed by a Q&A and concert by Spanish singer Patricia Kraus in her American debut.

 

WHEN: 
Nov. 2 – Nov. 19:

Thursday Nov. 2
• 6 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.: Red Carpet and Opening Ceremonies
• 8 p.m.: Culture Clash: An American Odyssey (Theatre 1)
• 8 p.m.: Las mariposas saltan al vacío (Theatre 2)
• 8 p.m.: WET: A DACAmented Journey (Theatre 4)
• 8:30 p.m.: Dementia (Theatre 3)
• 8:30 p.m.: Broken Tailbone (Avalos Theatre)
• 9:30 p.m. and 9:50 p.m.: Patas Arriba (Vault, Sub Lobby, Green Room and Tunnel)

 

Friday, Nov. 3
• 8 p.m.: Deferred Action (1)
• 8 p.m.: Las mariposas saltan al vacío (2)
• 8 p.m.: Miss Julia (4)
• 8:30 p.m.: Dementia (3)
• 8:30 p.m.: Broken Tailbone (Avalos)
• 9:30 p.m. and 9:50 p.m.: Patas Arriba (Vault, Sub Lobby, Green Room and Tunnel)

 

Saturday, Nov. 4 (matinee)
• 2 p.m.: Deferred Action (1)
• 2 p.m.: Latin Standards (2)
• 2 p.m.: Quemar las naves. El viaje de Emma (3)
• 2:30 p.m.: Ropa Intima (4)
• 2:30 p.m.: Conjunto Blues (Avalos)

 

Saturday, Nov. 4 (evening)
• 8 p.m.: El Apagón / The Blackout (1)
• 8 p.m.: Latin Standards (2)
• 8 p.m.: Quemar las naves. El viaje de Emma (3)
• 8:30 p.m.: Ropa Intima (4)
• 8:30 p.m.: Conjunto Blues (Avalos)
• 9:30 p.m. and 9:50 p.m.: Patas Arriba (Vault, Sub Lobby, Green Room and Tunnel)

 

Sunday, Nov. 5 (matinee)
• 2 p.m.: El Apagón / The Blackout (1)
• 2 p.m.: 10 Million / 10 Millones (2)
• 2 p.m.: Quemar las naves. El viaje de Emma (3)
• 2:30 p.m.: La Razón Blindada (4)
• 2:30 p.m.: Conjunto Blues (Avalos)

 

Sunday, Nov. 5 (evening)
• 7 p.m.: Culture Clash: An American Odyssey (1)
• 7 p.m.: 10 Million / 10 Millones (2)
• 7 p.m.: La Razón Blindada (4)
• 7:30 p.m.: Dementia (3)
• 7:30 p.m.: Broken Tailbone (Avalos)

 

Tuesday, Nov. 7
• 7:30 p.m.: Cinema & Music: free screening of the soon-to-be-released documentary Chavela followed by a musical concert

Wednesday, Nov. 8
• 5 p.m.: La Razón Blindada (4)
• 7:30 p.m.: Cinema & Music: free screening of NALIP (short films) followed by a Q&A and concert by Spanish singerPatricia Kraus
• 10 p.m.: Miss Julia (4)

 

Thursday Nov. 9 
• 12 p.m.: Ropa Intima (4)
• 8 p.m.: El Apagón / The Blackout (1)
• 8 p.m.: Las mariposas saltan al vacío (2)
• 8 p.m.: Quemar las naves. El viaje de Emma (3)
• 8:30 p.m.: Ropa Intima (4)
• 8:30 p.m.: Conjunto Blues (Avalos)
• 9:30 p.m. and 9:50 p.m.: Patas Arriba (Vault, Sub Lobby, Green Room and Tunnel)

 

Friday, Nov. 10
• 2:30 p.m.: Las mariposas saltan al vacío (2)
• 8 p.m.: El Apagón / The Blackout (1)
• 8 p.m.: Las mariposas saltan al vacío (2)
• 8 p.m.: Ropa Intima (4)
• 8:30 p.m.: Dementia (3)
• 9:30 p.m. and 9:50 p.m.: Patas Arriba (Vault, Sub Lobby, Green Room and Tunnel)
• 10 p.m.: Conjunto Blues (Avalos)

 

Saturday, Nov. 11 (matinee)
• 10:30 a.m.: Miss Julia (4)
• 2 p.m.: Culture Clash: An American Odyssey (1)
• 2 p.m.: Latin Standards (2)
• 2 p.m.: Miss Julia (4)
• 2:30 p.m.: Dementia (3)
• 2:30 p.m.: Conjunto Blues (Avalos)

 

Saturday, Nov. 11 (evening)
• 8 p.m.: Culture ClashAn American Odyssey (1)
• 8 p.m.: Miss Julia (4)
• 8 p.m.: Dementia (3)
• 8:30 p.m.: Broken Tailbone (Avalos)
• 9:30 p.m. and 9:50 p.m.: Patas Arriba (Vault, Sub Lobby, Green Room and Tunnel)
• 10 p.m.: Latin Standards (2)

 
Sunday, Nov. 12 (matinee)
• 2 p.m.: Deferred Action (1)
• 2 p.m.: 10 Million / 10 Millones (2)
• 2 p.m.: Quemar las naves. El viaje de Emma (3)
• 2:30 p.m.: WET: A DACAmented Journey (4)
• 2:30 p.m.: Broken Tailbone (Avalos)

 

Sunday, Nov. 12 (evening)
• 5:30 p.m.: Deferred Action (1)
• 5:30 p.m.: 10 Million / 10 Millones (2)
• 5:30 p.m.: Quemar las naves. El viaje de Emma (3)
• 6 p.m.: WET: A DACAmented Journey (4)
• 6 p.m.: Broken Tailbone (Avalos)

 

Thursday Nov. 16
• 8 p.m.: Culture Clash: An American Odyssey (1)
• 8 p.m.: Las mariposas saltan al vacío (2)
• 8 p.m.: Emma (3)
• 8:30 p.m.: WET: A DACAmented Journey (4)
• 8:30 p.m.: Broken Tailbone (Avalos)
• 9:30 p.m. and 9:50 p.m.: Patas Arriba  (Vault, Sub Lobby, Green Room and Tunnel)

 

Friday, Nov. 17
• 8 p.m.: Culture ClashAn American Odyssey (1)
• 8 p.m.: Las mariposas saltan al vacío (2)
• 8 p.m.: La Razón Blindada (4)
• 8:30 p.m.: Dementia (3)
• 8:30 p.m.: Broken Tailbone (Avalos)
• 9:30 p.m. and 9:50 p.m.: Patas Arriba  (Vault, Sub Lobby, Green Room and Tunnel)

 

Saturday, Nov. 18 (matinee)
• 2 p.m.: Deferred Action (1)
• 2 p.m.: 10 Million / 10 Millones (2)
• 2 p.m.: Ropa Intima (4)
• 2:30 p.m.: Quemar las naves. El viaje de Emma (3)
• 2:30 p.m.: Conjunto Blues (Avalos)

 

Saturday, Nov. 18 (evening)
• 8 p.m.: Deferred Action (1)
• 8 p.m.: 10 Million / 10 Millones (2)
• 8 p.m.: Ropa Intima (4)
• 8:30 p.m.: Quemar las naves. El viaje de Emma (3)
• 8:30 p.m.: Conjunto Blues (Avalos)
• 9:30 p.m. and 9:50 p.m.: Patas Arriba  (Vault, Sub Lobby, Green Room and Tunnel)

 

Sunday, Nov. 19 (matinee)
• 2 p.m.: El Apagón The Blackout (1)
• 2 p.m.: Latin Standards (2)
• 2 p.m.: Dementia (3)
• 2:30 p.m.: Miss Julia (4)
• 2:30 p.m.: Conjunto Blues (Avalos)

 

Sunday, Nov. 19 (evening)
• 7 p.m.: El Apagón / The Blackout (1)
• 7 p.m.: Latin Standards (2)
• 7 p.m.: Dementia (3)
• 7:30 p.m.: Miss Julia (4)
• 7:30 p.m.: Broken Tailbone (Avalos)

 

WHERE:
The Los Angeles Theatre Center
514 S. Spring Street
Los Angeles, CA 90013

 

HOW:
(866) 811-4111 or www.thelatc.org

TICKET PRICES:
• Single Show: $44
• 2 shows in one day: $80
• 6 shows (mix ‘n match): $180
• 13 shows: $310
• Patas Arriba micro-theater festival: $20 (includes four 15-minute plays)
• Cinema & Music mini-festival: Free
Discounts available for students, seniors and veterans.

 

PARKING:
• Metered parking available on streets surrounding the theater.
• Parking lots range in price from $6 – $12.
• Take the Metro: nearest stop is Pershing Square (two blocks west of The LATC).

Please like & share:
Entertainment News

Latino Theater Company to unveil ‘Lupe Ontiveros Theatre’ at the LATC

LOS ANGELES (June 14, 2017) — The Latino Theater Company will rename one of five theaters at downtown’s Los Angeles Theatre Centercomplex in honor of award-winning Mexican American actress and community activist Lupe Ontiveros, who was a founding member of the company.

According to artistic director Jose Luis Valenzuela,

 

“After Lupe’s untimely passing in 2012, we decided that renaming one of the theater spaces here would be a wonderful tribute to our friend who paved the way for so many.”

 

A multi-faceted performer, Ontiveros was equally at home performing on stage and screen. She appeared in the original 1978 production of “Zoot Suit” at the Mark Taper Forum, as well as in over 100 movies and TV shows ranging from “El Norte” to “Desperate Housewives” to “Selena.” Thanks to a generous contribution from SONY Pictures, the 250-capacity theater, formerly known only as “Theater 2,” has been refitted to accommodate film in addition to live theater.

 

A private, invitation-only ceremony will take place on Saturday, June 17 to officially unveil the refurbished Lupe Ontiveros Theatre. Guests will include actors Edward James Olmos and Robert Beltran, Los Angeles City Councilmember Gil Cedillo, former Mayor of Los Angeles Antonio Villaraigosa, and former member of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors and Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation AuthorityGloria Molina.

 

The Latino Theater Company has operated The Los Angeles Theatre Center, a facility of the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs and a landmark building in Downtown’s Historic Core, since 2006.

Please like & share: