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An Evening with Jonatha Brooke

Critically Acclaimed American Folk Rock
Singer-Songwriter and Guitarist


Zipper Concert Hall, The Colburn School


Wednesday, October 18 at 8:00 p.m.


Who:
Merging elements of folk, rock and pop, often with poignant lyrics and complex harmonies, Jonatha Brooke performs live in concert for one-night only at Los Angeles’ Zipper Concert Hall at the Colburn School in downtown Los Angeles. Jonatha has been a singer, songwriter, and guitarist since the late 80’s, and her songs have been used in television shows and movies. Jonatha began her career as one half of The Story (originally called “Jonatha & Jennifer”), a duo which played the coffeehouse folk circuit and radio in Boston along with two successful albums. After four major label releases, Jonatha started her own independent label, Bad Dog Records in 1999, and has since released eight more albums including the companion CD to her critically acclaimed one woman, Off-Broadway show My Mother Has 4 Noses (which ran for 10 weeks) and her most recent studio release, the timely “Midnight. Hallelujah” (2016), the first time ever a woman has composed, arranged, produced and performed a complete album of Woody Guthrie songs.


In recent years, Jonatha has co-written songs with Katy Perry (for her album PRISM), and The Courtyard Hounds. She’s also written for four Disney films, various television shows, and composed the theme song for Joss Whedon’s Dollhouse.


“I’m so looking forward to playing Los Angeles again. It’s been way too long, and there’s certainly a lot to sing about. Sometimes it feels like music is the ONLY way to try to make sense of what’s going on in the world. I’ll be bringing some shiny brand new songs, and I will polish off the old beloveds too,”

exclaimed Jonatha

Expect provocative songs, performed with great wit and charm. 

Charming and very funny. A seasoned musician with a beautiful voice, Brooke rocks it

— The New Yorker


When:             Wednesday, October 18, 2017 @ 8 p.m.


Where:            Zipper Concert Hall
                        Colburn School
200 South Grand Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90012


How/Information:
– Tickets: $37; $28; $18
– 
www.kalakoa.comhttp://kalakoa.tix.com/(800) 595-4849kalakoaent@mac.com
– 
https://www.facebook.com/kalakoa/; @kalakoa
– 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7pzLWqJQOTc
– 
http://www.npr.org/sections/world-cafe/2016/11/21/502894044/jonatha-brooke-on-world-cafe

– http://jonathabrooke.com/

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Entertainment News

Latino Theater Company announces ‘Encuentro de las Américas’ 14 theater companies from across the Americas, one vibrant celebration in the heart of downtown Los Angeles

L.A.’s Latino Theater Company will be joined by 13 companies from the U.S., Canada, Mexico, Cuba, Peru and Colombia for a three-week celebration of dynamic, contemporary Latinx and Latin American theater. Encuentro de Las Américasproduced by the Latino Theater Company in association with Latinx Theatre Commons, is set to take place at downtown’s The Los Angeles Theatre Center from Nov. 2 through Nov. 19.

 

The 14 companies will present their work in repertory, with performances running simultaneously every Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday in the five spaces that make up The LATC’s multi-theater complex. The companies include 24th Street Theatre from Los Angeles, CAArgos Teatro from Havana,CubaCara Mía Theater Company from Dallas, TXCompañía Nacional de las Artes from BogotáColombiaCulture Clash from Los AngelesCAÉbano Teatro from LimaPeruEnsemble Studio Theatre/LA from Los Angeles, CAGuadalupe Cultural Arts Center from San AntonioTXLatino Theater Company from Los AngelesCAMarga Gomez from San FranciscoCANightswimmingfrom Toronto, ONCanadaOrganización Secreta Teatro, from Mexico CityMexicoPregones Theaterfrom BronxNY; and Vueltas Bravas from BogotáColombia.

 

An additional 12 Los Angeles-based artists will be represented in Patas Arriba (“Upside Down”), a late night “micro-theater festival” set to take place in the “belly” of The LATC, where audiences will cycle through the non-traditional performance spaces of the building — Vault, Sub Lobby, Green Room and Tunnel — to experience four 15-minute works during each hour-long performance. Patas Arriba will take place every Thursday, Friday and Saturday, with two staggered start times (9:30 p.m. and 9:50 p.m.) and a different line-up of four plays each week.

 

A free Cinema & Music mini-festival on Tuesday and Wednesday nights will pair musical performances with screenings of soon-to be-released films, including Chavelaa new documentary about Costa Rican-Mexican singer Chavela Vargas and NALIP, an evening of short films followed by a concert by Spanish singer Patricia Kraus in her American debut.

 

Finally, the 26 companies will work together to share creative methodologies that will culminate in the co-creation of five new works presented on the last day of the festival. This unique collaboration offers participants an in-depth opportunity to mesh aesthetic diversity of Latinx and Latin American work, thus furthering the mission of the festival to create a global theater community.

 

“That’s what makes our Encuentro so unique, so different from any festival here or anywhere else in the world,”

 

says Latino Theater Company artistic director José Luis Valenzuela.

 

“It’s about artists working together and creating new work.”

 

According to Valenzuela, Encuentro de Las Américas is a natural extension of the national Encuentro presented by LTC three years ago.

 

“In 2014, we explored the relationship of American Latinos to the rest of the theater landscape in the U.S.,”

 

he explains.

 

“The question this time, with artists participating not only from this country, but from Canada, Latin and South America, and the Caribbean, is how can American Latinx and Latin American theater-makers have a conversation? Where are we going? How do we jointly embrace our voice?”

 

The Latino Theater Company is dedicated to providing a world-class arts center for those pursuing artistic excellence; a laboratory where both tradition and innovation are honored and honed; and a place where the convergence of people, cultures and ideas contribute to the future. Now in its 31st year, LTC has operated The Los Angeles Theatre Center, a facility of the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs and a landmark building in Downtown’s Historic Core, since 2006.

 

 

Encuentro de las Américas takes place from Nov. 2 through Nov. 19. Single tickets are $22 for students, seniors and vets and $44 general admission. Discounts are available for 2-play, 6-play and 13-play packages. Tickets to the Patas Arriba micro-theater festival are $20. Tickets to the Cinema & Music mini-festival are freeTheLos Angeles Theatre Center is located at 514 S. SpringSt., Los AngelesCA 90013. For more information and to purchase tickets, call (866811-4111 or go to www.thelatc.org.

 

 

Detailed descriptions and scheduling:
Encuentro de Las Américas

 

WHAT:
Encuentro de Las Américas
 — Fourteen companies from the U.S. Canada, Mexico, Cuba, Peru and Colombia  celebrate dynamic, contemporary Latinx and Latin American theater during a three-week festival, with five performances presented simultaneously every Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday in the five performance spaces that make up The Los Angeles Theatre Center. An additional 12 Los Angeles-based artists will be represented in Patas Arriba (“Upside Down”), a late night “micro-theater festival” set to take place in the “belly” of The LATC, where audiences will cycle through the non-traditional performance spaces of the building — Vault, Sub Lobby, Green Room and Tunnel — to experience four 15-minute works during each hour-long performance. A free Cinema & Music mini-festival on Tuesday and Wednesday nights will pair musical performances with screenings of soon-to be-released films, including Chavela, a new documentary about Costa Rican-Mexican singer Chavela Vargas and NALIP, an evening of short films followed by a concert by Spanish singer Patricia Kraus in her American debut. Produced by the Latino Theater Company in association with Latinx Theatre Commons.

 

WHO:
24th Street Theatre, Los AngelesCA
♦ La Razón Blindada
 (“Armored Reason”)written and directed by Arístides Vargas — In this sublimely witty and provocative play, two political prisoners are allowed to interact with one another for one hour each week. Confined to their chairs and never allowed to stand, they entertain each other with stories of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza as we witness the power of theater to transport them. Triply inspired by the classic novel “El Quixote” by Cervantes, “The Truth About Sancho Panza” by Franz Kafka, and testimonies from Chicho Vargas and other political prisoners held in Rawson Prison during Argentina’s “Dirty War” of the 1970s. A Los Angeles Times “Critic’s Choice” and winner of the 2011 LA Weekly “Production of the Year” award, this 24th Street production has toured around the U.S. as well as to Mexico City, Culiacán, Baja Mexico, San Salvador, Colombia and Ecuador. (Performed in Spanish with English supertitles)

 

La Razón Blindada
(“The Armored Reason”)
24th Street Theatre
Los Angeles, CA
Photo by Juan Tallo

 

 

Argos TeatroHavana, Cuba
♦ 10 Million / 10 Millones, written and directed by Carlos Celdrán — Cuba, 1970s and ‘80s. A young man comes of age during the tumultuous aftermath of Fidel Castro’s revolution. Torn between the ideals of his communist mother and his alienated middle-class father, he seeks to find his own way in a world turned upside down by history. Winner of the Cuban National Theater Award 2016 and awarded the Cuban Critic Award 2017. (Performed in Spanish with English supertitles)

 

10 Million Argos Teatro Havana, Cuba Photo by Manolo Garriga

 

 

Cara Mía Theater CompanyDallas, TX
♦ Deferred Action by David Lozano and Lee Trulldirected by David Lozano — Javier Mejía arrived in the U.S. as an undocumented minor. Now, years later, he finds himself caught in the tangle of existing immigration laws, new presidential policies and the harsh reality of living in the shadows. Deferred Action follows the lives, loopholes and dangers of those who dare to dream. (Performed in English and Spanish, with Spanish and English supertitles)

 

Deferred Action
Cara Mia Theater Company
Dallas, TX
Photo by Karen Almond

 

 

Compañía Nacional de las ArtesBogotáColombia
♦ Las mariposas saltan al vacío (“The Butterflies jump to the void”) by José Miliándirected by Jorge Cao —  In 1993, José Milián shook the Cuban theatrical scene when he premiered this work about living with AIDS. Shadowed by the presence of death, a motley group of institutionalized individuals debate about life, illness, tolerance, love, treason, loneliness, reality, dream and fantasy before presenting an improvised play for the other patients. (Performed in Spanish with English supertitles)

 

 

Las mariposas saltan al vacío saltan al vacío
(“The Butterflies jump to the void”)
Compañía Nacional de las Artes
Bogotá, Colombia
Photo courtesy of the artists

 
Culture Clash, Los AngelesCA
♦ Culture Clash: An American Odysseywritten by Richard MontoyaRic Salinas and Herbert Siguenza, directed byRobert Beltran — The Chicano kings of comedy perform 33 years worth of monologues and scenes from award-winning productions such as Radio Mambo, Nuyorican Stories, and Bordertown as well as an exclusive piece created just for Encuentro de las Américas. Along the way, we meet the unheard voices of the marginalized and give space to their truth. (Performed in English, Spanish and Caló with Spanish and English supertitles)

 

Ébano TeatroLimaPeru
 Ropa Intima (“Intimate Apparel”) by Lynn Nottage, directed by Haysen Percovich — Set in 1905 New York, Esther, a black seamstress, painstakingly crafts delicate undergarments for clientele ranging from young brides to wealthy matrons to ladies of the night. As Esther yearns to escape her life of drudgery and isolation, letters from a distant admirer in Panama offer the promise of love and a future. (Performed in Spanish with English supertitles)

Ropa Intima
Ébano Teatro
Lima, Peru
Photo courtesy of the artists

 

 

Ensemble Studio Theatre/LA, Los AngelesCA
♦ WET: A DACAmented Journey
written and performed by Alex Alpharaoh, directed by Kevin Comartin — Based on the playwright’s own experiences, Alex Alpharaoh’s acclaimed solo show tells the story of Anner Cividanis, an American in every sense of the word except one: on paper. Chronicling Anner’s life as an undocumented worker, WET: A DACAmented Journey captures the desperation of being a DREAMer in the U.S. (Performed in English with Spanish supertitles)

 

WET: A DACAmented Journey
Ensemble Studio Theatre/LA
Los Angeles, CA
Photo by Youthana Yuos

 

 

Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center, San AntonioTX
♦ Conjunto Blueswritten by Nicolás R. Valdez, directed by Ruben C. Gonzalez — Nicolas Valdez time travels seamlessly through button accordion riff and character as he shares a live-music history lesson of conjunto music as a form of cultural resistance and liberation from the campos to the cantinas. (Performed in English and Spanish with Spanish and English supertitles)

 

Conjunto Blues
Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center
San Antonio, TX
Photo courtesy of the artists

 

 

Latino Theater Company, Los AngelesCA
♦ Dementia by Evelina Fernández, directed by José Luis Valenzuela — Skeletons aren’t the only things that come out of the closet in this award-winning Latino swansong about the glamorous death of Moises (his friends call him Moe). Mortality never seemed so fabulous as he invites his closest friends over for a “going away for good party.” Demented fantasies abound as his alter ego, a torch singing drag queen, tempts him into his famous final scene. (Performed in English and Spanish with Spanish and English supertitles)

Dementia The Latino Theater Company Los Angeles, CA Photo by Christopher Ash

 

 

 

Marga GomezSan FranciscoCA
♦ Latin Standardswritten and performed by Marga Gomez, directed by David Schweizer — The adult child of a Cuban entertainer attempts to honor her macho immigrant dad by launching a hipster comedy night at the legendary San Francisco Latino drag club, Esta Noch. An energetic, funny and poignant story of perseverance and creative addiction passed down from immigrant father to lesbian daughter. (Performed in English with Spanish supertitles)

 

Nightswimming, Toronto, ONCanada
 Broken Tailbone, written and performed by Carmen Aguirre, directed by Brian Quirt — Carmen Aguirre leads a public Latin American dance lesson, woven together with hilarious and moving stories of her own experiences in the hidden world of dancehalls in Canada. DJ Don Pedro Chamale creates an irresistible musical environment to get even the most reluctant dancer up on their feet! Daring, sexy and above all, fun, each dance lesson flows into Carmen’s stories of intimacy, politics, culture and the forgotten origins of each dance. (Performed in English and Spanish with Spanish and English supertitles)

Broken Tailbone
Nightswimming
Toronto, ON, Canada
Photo courtesy of the artist

 

 

Organización Secreta TeatroMexico CityMexico
♦ Quemar las naves. El viaje de Emma (“Burning the ships: Emma’s Journey”) written and directed by Rocío Carrillo— A powerful and visually stunning feminist adaptation of Homer’s The Odyssey. Following the death of her husband, Emma embarks on a maritime journey in search of the meaning life. She and her ragtag crew of sailors, pirates, past loves and Greek gods face trials and challenges of mythical proportions. (Performed without words)

 

Quemar las naves. El viaje de Emma
(“Burning the ships: Emma’s Journey”)
Organización Secreta Teatro
Mexico City, Mexico
Photo by Luis Quiroz

 

 

 

Pregones TheaterBronxNY
♦ El Apagón /The Blackout, adapted for the stage by Alvan Colón-LespierJorge B. Merced and Rosalba Rolón, directed by Rosalba Rolón — While riding the New York subway uptown from Brooklyn to El Barrio, eager to witness the birth of his firstborn, a Puerto Rican factory worker and his best friend, Trompoloco are caught in the Great Northeastern Blackout of 1965. Acclaimed as “the quintessential ‘Boricua’ play,” the production is an adaptation of the short story “The Night We Became People Again” (“La noche en la que volvimos a ser gente”) by José Luis González, performed in Spanish and English, and set to the beat of popular Latin songs from the 1950s and ‘60s. (Performed in English and Spanish with Spanish and English supertitles)

 

El Apagón /The Blackout
Pregones Theatre
Bronx, NY
Photo by Marisol Díaz

 

 

Vueltas BravasBogotáColombia
♦ Miss Julia, a bilingual adaptation by J. Ed Araiza based on the play Miss Julie by August Strindberg, directed byLorenzo Montanini — Set in Colombia on Midsummer Eve, Miss Julia and her servant Juan have an encounter that will change their lives forever. As Juan tries to rise from the depths of his servile life, Miss Julia wants to escape the bonds that tie her to a meaningless upper-class existence. The result is a power play of love, lust and a battle of the classes which becomes violent and seemingly out of control. (Performed in Spanish and English with English and Spanish supertitles)

 

Miss Julia
Vueltas Bravas
Bogotá, Colombia
Photo by Federico Rios

 

 

Late night micro-theater festival 
♦ Patas Arriba
 (“Upside Down”): An L.A. Anthology, a late night “micro-theater festival” set to take place in the “belly” of The LATC, where audiences will cycle through the Vault, Sub Lobby, Green Room and Tunnel to experience four 15-minute works during each hour-long performance.

 

WEEK 1:
♦ Morir en Vida, choreographed and danced by Ela Aldrete — Human beings who risk their more valuable possession (their bodies, their lives) in search of a utopian life. (The Vault)
♦ Blood Match by Oliver Mayer — Amidst the heroin fields of Sinaloa, Mexico, three young people form a lover´s triangle in a world where life is cheap and poppies can make or break a man. (Sub-Lobby)
♦ Las García, written and performed by Gabriela Ortega — Two Dominican women of the same bloodline fight to find their true selves. (Green Room)
♦ Ka Ata Quilla by Milagros Lizarraga — The pre-Incan moon divinity of the Titicaca Lake, where the Incan culture began. (The Tunnel)

 

WEEK 2:
♦ Quetzal y Colibrí, written and performed by Alex Alpharaoh and Elisa Noemi (The Vault)
♦ Miss Honduras by Rickerby Hinds — the story of Maria Estela Gallardo. (Sub-Lobby)
♦ Aprender A Caer by Mick García and Cris-lan García — 10 seconds can feel like 10 minutes in which you see a whole life pass by. (Green Room)
♦ Samudrachoreographed by Beatriz Eugenia Vásquez — Inspired by the water issues the planet currently faces and the denial of global warming by some of our world leaders. (The Tunnel)

 

WEEK 3:
♦ Browner, Queerer, Louder, Prouder, written and performed by Monica Palacios — Speaks to our present divisive political and social climate. (The Vault)
♦ Manos Arriba by Mercedes Floresislas — When the guests fail to show up, Ramon needs help from the audience to show the Deaf Latinx pride. (Sub-Lobby)
♦ Queen of Califas by Israel Lopez and the Southland Company — Three drivers make their way through the California Highway system on a lonely Sunday evening. (Green Room)
♦ Jardín by Chicanas, Cholas Chisme — Dia De Los Muertos in Los Angeles: the night when our ancestors come back to visit. (The Tunnel)

 

Cinema & Music mini-festival (free)
♦ Chavela, directed by Catherine Gund and Daresha Kyi — An evocative, thought-provoking documentary about the iconoclastic, game-changing artist Chavela Vargas. Followed by a musical performance,
♦ NALIP — an evening of short films followed by a Q&A and concert by Spanish singer Patricia Kraus in her American debut.

 

WHEN: 
Nov. 2 – Nov. 19:

Thursday Nov. 2
• 6 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.: Red Carpet and Opening Ceremonies
• 8 p.m.: Culture Clash: An American Odyssey (Theatre 1)
• 8 p.m.: Las mariposas saltan al vacío (Theatre 2)
• 8 p.m.: WET: A DACAmented Journey (Theatre 4)
• 8:30 p.m.: Dementia (Theatre 3)
• 8:30 p.m.: Broken Tailbone (Avalos Theatre)
• 9:30 p.m. and 9:50 p.m.: Patas Arriba (Vault, Sub Lobby, Green Room and Tunnel)

 

Friday, Nov. 3
• 8 p.m.: Deferred Action (1)
• 8 p.m.: Las mariposas saltan al vacío (2)
• 8 p.m.: Miss Julia (4)
• 8:30 p.m.: Dementia (3)
• 8:30 p.m.: Broken Tailbone (Avalos)
• 9:30 p.m. and 9:50 p.m.: Patas Arriba (Vault, Sub Lobby, Green Room and Tunnel)

 

Saturday, Nov. 4 (matinee)
• 2 p.m.: Deferred Action (1)
• 2 p.m.: Latin Standards (2)
• 2 p.m.: Quemar las naves. El viaje de Emma (3)
• 2:30 p.m.: Ropa Intima (4)
• 2:30 p.m.: Conjunto Blues (Avalos)

 

Saturday, Nov. 4 (evening)
• 8 p.m.: El Apagón / The Blackout (1)
• 8 p.m.: Latin Standards (2)
• 8 p.m.: Quemar las naves. El viaje de Emma (3)
• 8:30 p.m.: Ropa Intima (4)
• 8:30 p.m.: Conjunto Blues (Avalos)
• 9:30 p.m. and 9:50 p.m.: Patas Arriba (Vault, Sub Lobby, Green Room and Tunnel)

 

Sunday, Nov. 5 (matinee)
• 2 p.m.: El Apagón / The Blackout (1)
• 2 p.m.: 10 Million / 10 Millones (2)
• 2 p.m.: Quemar las naves. El viaje de Emma (3)
• 2:30 p.m.: La Razón Blindada (4)
• 2:30 p.m.: Conjunto Blues (Avalos)

 

Sunday, Nov. 5 (evening)
• 7 p.m.: Culture Clash: An American Odyssey (1)
• 7 p.m.: 10 Million / 10 Millones (2)
• 7 p.m.: La Razón Blindada (4)
• 7:30 p.m.: Dementia (3)
• 7:30 p.m.: Broken Tailbone (Avalos)

 

Tuesday, Nov. 7
• 7:30 p.m.: Cinema & Music: free screening of the soon-to-be-released documentary Chavela followed by a musical concert

Wednesday, Nov. 8
• 5 p.m.: La Razón Blindada (4)
• 7:30 p.m.: Cinema & Music: free screening of NALIP (short films) followed by a Q&A and concert by Spanish singerPatricia Kraus
• 10 p.m.: Miss Julia (4)

 

Thursday Nov. 9 
• 12 p.m.: Ropa Intima (4)
• 8 p.m.: El Apagón / The Blackout (1)
• 8 p.m.: Las mariposas saltan al vacío (2)
• 8 p.m.: Quemar las naves. El viaje de Emma (3)
• 8:30 p.m.: Ropa Intima (4)
• 8:30 p.m.: Conjunto Blues (Avalos)
• 9:30 p.m. and 9:50 p.m.: Patas Arriba (Vault, Sub Lobby, Green Room and Tunnel)

 

Friday, Nov. 10
• 2:30 p.m.: Las mariposas saltan al vacío (2)
• 8 p.m.: El Apagón / The Blackout (1)
• 8 p.m.: Las mariposas saltan al vacío (2)
• 8 p.m.: Ropa Intima (4)
• 8:30 p.m.: Dementia (3)
• 9:30 p.m. and 9:50 p.m.: Patas Arriba (Vault, Sub Lobby, Green Room and Tunnel)
• 10 p.m.: Conjunto Blues (Avalos)

 

Saturday, Nov. 11 (matinee)
• 10:30 a.m.: Miss Julia (4)
• 2 p.m.: Culture Clash: An American Odyssey (1)
• 2 p.m.: Latin Standards (2)
• 2 p.m.: Miss Julia (4)
• 2:30 p.m.: Dementia (3)
• 2:30 p.m.: Conjunto Blues (Avalos)

 

Saturday, Nov. 11 (evening)
• 8 p.m.: Culture ClashAn American Odyssey (1)
• 8 p.m.: Miss Julia (4)
• 8 p.m.: Dementia (3)
• 8:30 p.m.: Broken Tailbone (Avalos)
• 9:30 p.m. and 9:50 p.m.: Patas Arriba (Vault, Sub Lobby, Green Room and Tunnel)
• 10 p.m.: Latin Standards (2)

 
Sunday, Nov. 12 (matinee)
• 2 p.m.: Deferred Action (1)
• 2 p.m.: 10 Million / 10 Millones (2)
• 2 p.m.: Quemar las naves. El viaje de Emma (3)
• 2:30 p.m.: WET: A DACAmented Journey (4)
• 2:30 p.m.: Broken Tailbone (Avalos)

 

Sunday, Nov. 12 (evening)
• 5:30 p.m.: Deferred Action (1)
• 5:30 p.m.: 10 Million / 10 Millones (2)
• 5:30 p.m.: Quemar las naves. El viaje de Emma (3)
• 6 p.m.: WET: A DACAmented Journey (4)
• 6 p.m.: Broken Tailbone (Avalos)

 

Thursday Nov. 16
• 8 p.m.: Culture Clash: An American Odyssey (1)
• 8 p.m.: Las mariposas saltan al vacío (2)
• 8 p.m.: Emma (3)
• 8:30 p.m.: WET: A DACAmented Journey (4)
• 8:30 p.m.: Broken Tailbone (Avalos)
• 9:30 p.m. and 9:50 p.m.: Patas Arriba  (Vault, Sub Lobby, Green Room and Tunnel)

 

Friday, Nov. 17
• 8 p.m.: Culture ClashAn American Odyssey (1)
• 8 p.m.: Las mariposas saltan al vacío (2)
• 8 p.m.: La Razón Blindada (4)
• 8:30 p.m.: Dementia (3)
• 8:30 p.m.: Broken Tailbone (Avalos)
• 9:30 p.m. and 9:50 p.m.: Patas Arriba  (Vault, Sub Lobby, Green Room and Tunnel)

 

Saturday, Nov. 18 (matinee)
• 2 p.m.: Deferred Action (1)
• 2 p.m.: 10 Million / 10 Millones (2)
• 2 p.m.: Ropa Intima (4)
• 2:30 p.m.: Quemar las naves. El viaje de Emma (3)
• 2:30 p.m.: Conjunto Blues (Avalos)

 

Saturday, Nov. 18 (evening)
• 8 p.m.: Deferred Action (1)
• 8 p.m.: 10 Million / 10 Millones (2)
• 8 p.m.: Ropa Intima (4)
• 8:30 p.m.: Quemar las naves. El viaje de Emma (3)
• 8:30 p.m.: Conjunto Blues (Avalos)
• 9:30 p.m. and 9:50 p.m.: Patas Arriba  (Vault, Sub Lobby, Green Room and Tunnel)

 

Sunday, Nov. 19 (matinee)
• 2 p.m.: El Apagón The Blackout (1)
• 2 p.m.: Latin Standards (2)
• 2 p.m.: Dementia (3)
• 2:30 p.m.: Miss Julia (4)
• 2:30 p.m.: Conjunto Blues (Avalos)

 

Sunday, Nov. 19 (evening)
• 7 p.m.: El Apagón / The Blackout (1)
• 7 p.m.: Latin Standards (2)
• 7 p.m.: Dementia (3)
• 7:30 p.m.: Miss Julia (4)
• 7:30 p.m.: Broken Tailbone (Avalos)

 

WHERE:
The Los Angeles Theatre Center
514 S. Spring Street
Los Angeles, CA 90013

 

HOW:
(866) 811-4111 or www.thelatc.org

TICKET PRICES:
• Single Show: $44
• 2 shows in one day: $80
• 6 shows (mix ‘n match): $180
• 13 shows: $310
• Patas Arriba micro-theater festival: $20 (includes four 15-minute plays)
• Cinema & Music mini-festival: Free
Discounts available for students, seniors and veterans.

 

PARKING:
• Metered parking available on streets surrounding the theater.
• Parking lots range in price from $6 – $12.
• Take the Metro: nearest stop is Pershing Square (two blocks west of The LATC).

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Entertainment News

Company of Angels, Los Angeles’ Oldest Professional Theater, Debuts This Land by Mexican-American Playwright Evangeline Ordaz

A deep, painful, joyful story about one extended California family with roots in different parts of the world, who make their home on the same plot of Southern California land over 150 years. Los Angeles native and Mexican-American playwright, Evangeline Ordaz, crafts a rich and complex web of diverse characters from Los Angeles’ Latino, African-American, Anglo, and Native American communities who co-exist as if time were a wheel that constantly doubles back on itself. Through triumph and despair these families discover how deeply they are rooted in the dreams of their ancestors and the land on which they stand. Directed by Company of Angels artistic director, Armando MolinaThis Land debuts on October 20, at Company of Angels, Los Angeles’ oldest professional theater.

 

 
A host of old curses and blessings, traditions and recipes, loves and betrayals, conspire to threaten successive displacements. As the story unfolds, each successive generation grapples with their claim to the land on which they live. This Land takes place through the years; 1843, 1848, 1949, 1965, 1992, on what is now a residential street in Watts. “What’s so exciting about this play is that it’s not your typical history play. The stories are intimate and small yet they seem to whisper a big question so pertinent to Los Angeles today – “Is gentrification just another form of manifest destiny?” comments Artistic Director, Armando Molina.

 

 
Richard Azurdia (My Mañana Comes at Fountain Theatre, Backyard at Echo Theater Company, Bill & Joan at Sacred Fools, one of 54 “fascinating Angelenos” profiled by LA Weekly’s 2015 People issue) stars as Tomas and Fidel Avila. Niketa Calame (voice of young Nala in Disney’s Animated Feature The Lion KingThe Color Purple at Celebration Theater, Ain’t Misbehavin at ICT) portrays Leslie Parker/Mel Miller/Pepe, Ian Alda (Lieutenant of Inishmore at Mark Taper Forum, Broadway Bound at La Mirada and Odyssey Theater) takes on the role of Patrick Dalton/James and Dalton Hill, LeShay Tomlinson Boyce (Hellcab and Seven Red Neck Cheerleaders at Elephant Theater Company, Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom at Mark Taper Forum, Nominated for a NAACP Theater Award for Insurrection Holding History) plays Leola Parker/Sharon Curtis. Jeff Torres (Theatre: Henry IVLove’s Labour’s Lost, TV: Criminal MindsTelenovela) plays Enrique Avila/Ricardo Reyes, Cheryl Umana (Latino Theatre Company, Artists at Play at LATC, Kaiser Educational Theatre) plays Toya/Della, and Johanna McKay (performed in several productions at Circle X, and The Rubicon Theatre) plays Maeve Hilman. Scenic and Lighting Design by Justine Huen, Costume design by Manee Leija, Sound Design by Becca Kessin, and Video Design by Benjamin DurhamHeather McClane is the Assistant Stage Manager/Props and the Production Stage Manager is Daniel Munoz.

 

 
Ordaz is a UC Berkeley-trained attorney who practiced public interest law before becoming a full-time playwright and television writer. As an attorney she has practiced immigration, fair housing litigation, criminal appeals, and human rights law both in the United States and Mexico. Ordaz’s play This Land was first commissioned by the Center Theater Group which produced a public reading in February 2015. Her play Visitors’ Guide to Arivaca was featured at the Denver Center for the Performing Arts’ New Play Summit and was the subject of a December 2006 cover story in American Theater Magazine. Borderlands commissioned Visitor’s Guide, which also saw production by Teatro Vision in San Jose and Company of Angels Theater in Los Angeles. Company of Angels also produced Ordaz’s play Bordering on Love. Evangeline is currently a writer on the Starz drama Vida, the Netflix dramaSeven Seconds, and the BET drama In Contempt. She recently completed a film about the underground music scene in East L.A. for Odd Lot Entertainment.

 

 
Molina is a director and writer with a background in theater development. His recent directing credits include The Long Road Todayby Jose Cruz Gonzalez at South Coast Repertory, Distracted by Lisa Loomer at TheaterWorks, in Palo Alto, California, Visitors Guide to Arivaca by Evangeline Ordaz at Teatro Vision, San Jose, California and Company of Angels. Hippie Mexicana aka Digging Rios by Evangeline Ordaz at Borderlands Theater; Sissy by Ricardo Bracho at Company of Angels in Los Angeles, Anna In The Tropics by Nilo Cruz at PCPA Theaterfest in Santa Maria California; Living Out By Lisa Loomer at TheatreWorks and at Mixed Blood Theatre in Minneapolis, The Waiting Room by Lisa Loomer at Company of Angels in Los Angeles, Conjunto by Oliver Mayer at Borderlands Theater Company in Tucson, Arizona, Rocio by Oliver Mayer at King King in Hollywood. Armando received national recognition from the NEA and the Theater Communications Group as a recipient of their Career Development Program for Directors. Before leaving to freelance as a director, Armando was a member of the Cornerstone Theater ensemble. Armando co-founded Latins Anonymous, the critically acclaimed Latino Comedy Group, whose plays were published by Arte Publico Press and continue to be performed nationally.

 

 
Founded in 1959 by a group of television and film actors that included Richard Chamberlain, Leonard Nimoy and Vic Morrow, Company of Angels is the oldest professional theater in Los Angeles.  As such it has a revised mission to provide a space for the voices and audiences neglected by the major regional theaters.

 

 
Company of Angels now produces original work by professional theater artists who reflect the communities that make up the City of Los Angeles and engages residents from low-income communities including Boyle Heights and Skid Row to develop original theater pieces for performance. In this way CoA re-envisions theater to reflect and respond to the richness, diversity, and complexity that is Los Angeles, entertaining new audiences and serving the City of Angels.

 

 
Performances of This Land take place FridaysSaturdaysMondays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 7 p.m.Oct. 20 through Nov. 13. Tickets are $25; seniors $15; and students $12; Monday performances are Pay-What-You-Can. Company of Angels is located at 1350 San Pablo Street, Los Angeles, 90033. For reservations and information, (323) 475-8814 or go to www.companyofangels.org

 

 

 

Details for Calendar Listings
‘This Land’

 

 

WHAT:

A deep, painful, joyful story about one extended California family with roots in different parts of the world, who make their home on the same plot of Southern California land over 150 years. Los Angeles native and Mexican-American playwright, Evangeline Ordaz, crafts a rich and complex web of diverse characters from Los Angeles’ Latino, African-American, Anglo, and Native American communities who co-exist as if time were a wheel that constantly doubles back on itself. Through triumph and despair these families discover how deeply they are rooted in the dreams of their ancestors and the land on which they stand. Directed by Company of Angels artistic director, Armando MolinaThis Land debuts at Company of Angels, Los Angeles’ oldest professional theater.

 

 


WHO:

• Written by Evangeline Ordaz
• Directed by Armando Molina
• Starring Ian AldaRichard AzurdiaNiketa CalameJohanna McKayLeshay Tomlinson, Jeff Torres, Cheryl Umana

  • Scenic and Lighting Design by Justine Huen
    • Costume Design by Manee Leija
    • Sound Design by Becca Kessin
    • Video Design by Benjamin Durham
    • Assistant Stage Manager/Props by Heather McClane
    • Production Stage Manager by Danny Munoz
    • Presented by Company of Angels
  • WHEN:
    Performances October 20 – November 13
    • Fridays at 8 p.m.: Oct. 20, 27; Nov. 3, 10
    • Saturdays at 8 p.m.: Oct. 21, 28; Nov. 4, 11
    • Sundays at7 p.m.:Oct. 22, 29; Nov. 5, 12
    • Mondays at 8 p.m.: Oct. 23, 30; Nov. 6, 13

  • WHERE:
    Company of Angels
    1350 San Pablo Street
    Los Angeles, CA 90033

  • HOW:
    • Go to www.companyofangels.org
    • Email us at  info@companyofangels.org
    • Visit us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/companyofangels
    • Follow us on Twitter: @CoAngels

  • TICKET PRICE:
    $25; senior $15; students $12; Monday performances are Pay-What-You-Can

  • PARKING:
    Free parking in lot and ample street parking.

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For the Love of Felicia

For the Love of Felicia (Part 7)

“Now tell me how you figure you can ignore my calls and stay out all night when you have my son to take care of!” Terrence barked at Felicia.

“You know it isn’t even like that. How often do I go out? And you know TJ was well-cared for. I would never do anything to put him in harm’s way! I can’t believe that you think I would!”

“I know you aren’t raising your voice at me! You better respect me when you talk to me!” Terrence warned as he closed the distance between him and Felicia.

Backing up, attempting to regain some space, Felicia responded, “I can’t with you anymore, Terrence! I swear I put up with so much junk from you. And for what? You are in MY house telling me to respect you.” Laughing, Felicia continued, “You don’t even know what that word means. You come and go as you please. You don’t help me with anything except giving me headaches and stressing me the freak out. Hell, you can’t possibly love me. You have a woman at home, with more kids that you do nothing for. You…”

“I take care of mine!” Terrence interjected. “You sound like you have been letting Jessica get all up in your head with the crap you speaking.”

“No, Terrence, this is all me! I can’t take it anymore! I can’t take you! I can’t take taking care of you and all of your kids! I can’t take always making myself available to you! I can’t take not living my life because I stupidly think that you will one day change and do right by me! All you take care of is yourself. Maybe it’s time that I do the same.”

Surprising Felicia, Terrence suddenly lunged forward and wrapped his hands around her neck. Applying enough pressure to make her take notice, Terrence said, “Don’t start something that you can’t finish. You’re being real reckless with your words right now. What are you going to do without me? Be careful what you sayin’.”

Gaining some inner strength, Felicia stood as tall as she could and said, “This is the last time that you put your hands on me! Let go of my neck and get out of my house!”

Terrence released his grip, realizing that Felicia was serious and coming from a place he didn’t recognize. “My bad, Felicia, you know that I love you. You gotta stop making me act like this.”

“Nah, I don’t have to stop making you do anything. This is the last time that I’m going to tell you to leave. As far as TJ is concerned, I will let the courts handle that.”

Stepping back, Terrence lost the edge when he spoke, “I will leave because I can see that I have upset you. We will talk when you calm down. And you aren’t taking my son from me, so don’t do anything stupid.”

As Felicia stood and said nothing, Terrence continued to back towards the door. Once at the door, he turned and let himself out without another word. Only time would tell if he really got what Felicia had said to him. For now, at least he was gone and Felicia was still standing.

 

I can’t take taking care of you and all of your kids! I can’t take always making myself available… Click To Tweet

Get into ‘For the Love of Felicia’ (Parts 1-6) HERE.

 

Written by Dani Powell, RM Entertainment Original Story Contributor

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Entertainment News

World premiere ‘Freddy’ tells dramatic story of 1960s avant-garde hero through theater, music, dance, video

LOS ANGELES— A naïve young woman falls under the spell of Fred Herko, a brilliant ballet dancer of extraordinary charisma and talent and a fiery denizen of Andy Warhol’s Factory. Written by Fountain Theatre co-artistic director Deborah Lawlor, the world premiere of Freddy opens on Sept. 27, inaugurating a new partnership between the Fountain Theatre and the Los Angeles City College Theatre Academy at LACC’s Caminito Theatre.

 

Set in Greenwich Village in 1964 and based on a true story, Freddy fuses theater, music, dance and video to capture the explosive spirit of a passionate artist and a turbulent era. Marty Dew (Steven Spielberg’sReady Player One, Mascot) stars as Fred Herko, a founding member of Judson Dance Theater who was a legendary figure of New York’s avant-garde in the 1960s. Susan Wilder (Still Life at Rogue Machine Theatre) portrays Shelley, whose memories create the framework of the play, while Katie McConaughy(American Idiot at Cupcake Theater) plays her younger self. Mel England (Indie films Best Day Everand Ron and Laura Take Back America, Swimming with the Polar Bears off-Broadway) takes on the role of dancer, artist and designer James Waring, Herko’s friend and mentor. The cast is rounded out by Los Angeles City College Theatre Academy studentsAlexandra FiallosJamal HopesTristen Kim,Jackie Mohr, Lamont Oakley, Connor Clark Pascale, Justice Quinn, Savannah Rutledge,Brianna Saranchock, Trenton Tabak and Jesse Trout. Frances Loy directs.

 

Lawlor, who began her career as a dancer, choreographer and actor in New York, was a personal friend of Herko’s.

 

“I carried around all those memories for a very long time before I finally sat down to write,”

 

she says.

 

“Freddy and I were students of Jimmy Waring together, and we were both involved with the Judson Church, which was at the heart of the downtown dance scene. Freddy was a brilliant talent and good friend to many people. His death shocked us all.”

 

Fred Herko (1936-1964) was a central figure in New York’s downtown avant-garde. A musical prodigy, he studied piano at the Juilliard School of Music before switching to ballet at the age of twenty. In 1956 he won a scholarship to study at American Ballet Theatre School and within a few years was dancing with established choreographers including John Butler, Katherine Litz, Buzz Miller, Glen Tetley and James Waring. He was a founding member of Judson Dance Theater, presenting six of his own works in the group’s concerts between 1962 and 1964 and dancing in works by Al Hansen, Deborah Hay, Arlene Rothlein and Elaine Summers. He was a co-founder of the New York Poets Theatre, which staged one-act plays by poets and provided a podium for happenings by Ray Johnson, Allan Kaprow and Robert Whitman; dances by Yvonne Rainer and Trisha Brown; music by La Monte Young, John Herbert McDowell and Philip Corner; and films by Brian De Palma, Stan VanDerBeek and Andy Warhol. Herko starred in seven of Warhol’s earliest cinematic experiments in 1963, including Jill and Freddy Dancing, Rollerskate/Dance Movie and Salome and Delilah. His untimely death in 1964, at the age of 28, robbed New York’s underground scene of one of its most exuberant and versatile performers who was equally at home performing Comb Music by Fluxus composer George Brecht or camping it up in Rosalyn Drexler’s musical comedy Home Movies.

 

Freddy was always conceived as an off-site project because it requires a larger performance area than what we can offer at the Fountain,”

 

explains Lawlor’s co-artistic director, Stephen Sachs, who is an alumnus of the LACC Theatre Academy.

 

“In addition to sharing their remarkable facility, this collaboration gives Academy students the opportunity to work with professional actors and designers, and it gives us the chance to mentor young people who will become theater artists of tomorrow.”

 

The creative team for Freddy includes dance and movement director Cate Caplin, scenic designer Tesshi Nakagowa, lighting designer Derek Jones, sound designer Vern Yonemura, costume designer Jillian Ross and props master Amrit Samra. The production stage manager is Jasmine KalraJames Bennett and Leslie Ferreira produce for the Fountain Theatre and LACC Theatre Academy respectively.

 

Deborah Lawlor began her career as a dancer, choreographer and actor in New York before moving to South India, where she lived for five years. There, she was involved in the initial development of the international township of Auroville and created two full-length outdoor dance/theater pieces celebrating the community. She spent the next ten years in Australia and France studying ancient cultures of India and Egypt and translating several books in these fields from French into English. Returning to the U.S. in 1986, she became deeply involved in the intimate theater scene and, in 1990, she and Stephen Sachs co-founded the Fountain Theatre. Lawlor is responsible for the Fountain’s extensive dance involvement, including the company’s renowned “Forever Flamenco” series. Other dance projects at the Fountain includeThe Women of Guernica, Lawlor’s flamenco-based adaptation of Euripides’ The Trojan Women, which she also directed, and three full-evening dance-theater pieces which she created and directed: Declarations: Love Letters of the Great Romantics; The Path of Love, which she also directed in South India; and the dance opera, The Song of Songs, with music by Al Carmines. Actor’s Equity Association honored Lawlor with its Diversity Award for her dedication to presenting work at the Fountain that is culturally diverse.

 

A British director currently living in Los Angeles, Frances Loy creates text-based, ensemble driven work inspired and ignited by the darker experiences of humanity. She has a strong aesthetic towards up-close and intimate theater that puts the audience in the heart of the world created by the actors, and has particular experience in alternative performance spaces and immersive theatrical experiences. Frances was co-founder and artistic director of Theatre Delicatessen, described by Time Out London as “the leading light of pop-up theatre,” and she is artistic director of Ferment Theatre, whose production of Tonight/Jungle was given a New York Times “Critic’s Pick” by Ben Brantley. Frances also creates content for VR 360 films and is currently in pre-production for her first short film.

 

The Fountain Theatre is one of the most successful intimate theaters in Los Angeles, providing a creative home for multi-ethnic theater and dance artists. The Fountain has won over 225 awards, and Fountain projects have been seen across the U.S. and internationally. Recent highlights include the Fountain’s Citizen: An American Lyric being selected by Center Theatre Group for its inaugural launching of Block Party at the Kirk Douglas Theatre; and grant awards from The Greenberg Foundation, The Shubert Foundation, and a $50,000 gift from Drama-Logue founder Bill Bordy. The Fountain’s most recent production, the world premiere of Building the Wall by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Robert Schenkkan, ran for five months and was named “L.A. hottest ticket” by the Los Angeles Times.
Established in 1929, the theater training program at Los Angeles City College is one of the oldest and most respected training programs in the country. It has trained countless numbers of students who have gone on to successful careers in the entertainment industry in acting, directing, casting, production, writing, production coordination, design in lighting, sound, costuming and sets, technical production, technical direction, owners and directors of various theater-oriented businesses and organizations, and numerous technical and costuming specializations. Graduates from LACC have won numerous awards, including recipients of the Academy Award, Emmy Award, Tony Award and Bravo Award. Its teaching excellence has been heralded by the Kennedy Center/American College Theatre Festival, the California Community College Academic Senate, the California Educational Theatre Association, the Los Angeles Community College District, the County of Los Angeles and the City of Los Angeles. Further, the Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle gave LACC a special award for “maintaining consistently high standard of programming and production.”

 

Freddy runs Sept. 27 through Oct. 14, with performances on Wednesdays at 8 p.m.Thursdays at 3 p.m. and 8 p.m.;Fridays at 8 p.m.; and Saturdays at 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. General admission is $25. The Caminito Theatre is located on the campus of Los Angeles City College at 855 N Vermont Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90029. Parking is FREE in Structure 4 on Heliotrope at Monroe (between Santa Monica and Melrose). For reservations and information, call (323) 663-1525or go to www.FountainTheatre.com.

 

 

 

Details for Calendar Listings
Freddy
WHAT:
World premiere
 of Freddy — Set in Greenwich Village in 1964 and based on a true story, Freddy fuses theater, music, dance and video to capture the explosive spirit of a passionate artist and a turbulent era. A naïve young woman falls under the spell of Fred Herko, a brilliant ballet dancer of extraordinary charisma and talent and a fiery denizen of Andy Warhol’s Factory. This hybrid dance/theater work by Fountain Theatre co-artistic director Deborah Lawlor will be presented at Los Angeles City College, inaugurating a new partnership with the LACC Theatre Academy.
WHO: 
• Written by Deborah Lawlor
• Directed by Frances Loy
• Starring Marty DewMel EnglandKatie McConaughySusan Wilder
• Featuring members of the Los Angeles City College Theatre Academy: Alexandra FiallosJamal HopesTristen Kim,Jackie Mohr, Lamont Oakley, Connor Clark Pascale, Justice Quinn, Savannah Rutledge, Brianna Saranchock,Trenton Tabak, Jesse Trout
• Presented by The Fountain Theatre in association with Los Angeles City College Theatre Academy

WHEN: 
Performances: Sept. 27 – Oct. 14:
• Wednesdays at 8 p.m.: Sept. 27 (opening night); Oct. 4; Oct. 11
• Thursdays at 3 p.m.: Sept. 28; Oct. 5; Oct. 12
• Thursdays at 8 p.m.: Sept. 28; Oct. 5; Oct. 12
• Fridays at 8 p.m.: Sept, 29; Oct. 6; Oct. 13
• Saturdays at 3 p.m.: Sept 30; Oct. 7; Oct. 14
• Saturdays at 8 p.m.: Sept 30; Oct. 7; Oct. 14

WHERE:
Caminito Theatre
Los Angeles City College
855 N Vermont Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90029

PARKING:
FREE in Structure 4 on Heliotrope at Monroe
(between Santa Monica and Melrose)

HOW:
(323) 663-1525 or www.FountainTheatre.com
• Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/TheFountainTheatre
• Follow us on Twitter: @fountaintheatre
• Instagram: https://instagram.com/fountaintheatre/

TICKET PRICE:
$25

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Entertainment News

Kala Koa Entertainment presents the 2017 Los Angeles International  Ukulele Festival

Saturday, September 30; 9:30 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Torrance Cultural Arts Center


LOS ANGELES – Celebrating the little four-stringed wonder – the Ukulele – which has been captivating hearts and bringing musical joy into people’s lives for over 100 years, the 2017 Los Angeles International Ukulele Festival presented byKala Koa Entertainment, is an exciting day-long event dedicated to exploring the musical versatility of the ukulele for the experienced ukulele player, the occasional strummer, or simply the curious spectator. Taking place on Saturday, September 30 from 9:30 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. at the Torrance Cultural Arts Center, The Festival includes workshops for all levels of playing ability to work on technique or simply learn to play, live all-star performances by some of today’s most popular ukulele players (included in admission), as well as a variety of vendors and popular Hawaiian food and beverage options (for purchase). The 2017 Los Angeles International Ukulele Festival is the only festival of its kind where one can enjoy all-star performances all-day by today’s hottest ukulele talent plus access to all the workshops, all for $45 for the day – kids 12 and under are free to attend.

 

Honoka & Azita

Workshops at the Ukulele Festival include programs for Beginners (in Japanese and English); Strum-alongs; Pop Songs; Artist Q&As; Reggae Strumming; Scales; Intro to Hula; Singing for Ukulele Players; Chord Melodies; Blues for Ukulele; Intros & Endings; Triplets; and Get your Right Hand Grooving; and more. Artist and Workshop instructors include Li’l RevThe Ukulele Teacher,Cynthia LinFred SokolowMitch ChangUkulenny, MahealaniJody KamisatoVictoria VoxKalei GamiaoKrista Kupau,Mele OhanaHonoka & Azitafulare_pad, among others. Please check the Festival schedule online for updates and times at kalakoa.com/ukulele/schedule.

 

 
The ukulele is an instrument that is rich with history and tradition originating in the 19th century as a Hawaiian adaptation of the Portuguese machete, a small guitar-like instrument, which was introduced to Hawaii by Portuguese immigrants, mainly from Madeira and the Azores and is a member of the lute family of instruments. Ukuleles commonly come in four sizes: soprano, concert, tenor, and baritone and generally employs four nylon or gut strings or four courses of strings. The ukulele gained great popularity elsewhere in the United States during the early 20th century and from there spread internationally.

 

 
The ukulele is commonly associated with music from Hawaii where the name roughly translates as “jumping flea,” perhaps because of the movement of the player’s fingers. Legend attributes it to the nickname of the Englishman Edward William Purvis, one of King Kalākaua’s officers, because of his small size, fidgety manner, and playing expertise. According to Queen Liliʻuokalani, the last Hawaiian monarch, the name means “the gift that came here”, from the Hawaiian words uku (gift or reward) and lele (to come).

 


The ‘uke’ has found a unique home for itself in both traditional and popular music. Artists as diverse as Eddie Vedder, Amanda Palmer, Don Ho, and Jason Mraz have all made use of the ukulele over the years to add a special something to their classic songs. A great starting point for musicians of any age, the uke is an easy to learn instrument that will provide a challenge, as well as musical joy, for years to come.

 
Among the many performers and instructors participating in the 2017 Los Angeles International Ukulele Festival include (check the Festival website for updates):

 


Lil Rev
: A musician, educator, and storyteller of American roots music and culture whose heroes include Pete Seeger, Woody Guthrie, Josh White, Sonny Terry, Cicso Houston and Leadbelly.

 

“Lil Rev isn’t an act, he’s real.”

 

– Joe Hickerson, Former Head of Library of Congress Folk Archive

 

“Listen to this! Lil Rev is great!”

 

– Pete Seeger

 


Victoria Vox: From the cover of the Spring Issue of Ukulele Magazine to the front page of The Wall Street Journal, Victoria Vox is making appearances everywhere with performances unique and endearing, captivating an incredibly diverse audience.

 


Honoka & Azita: Gaining worldwide attention for their electrifying performances, Honoka & Azita are quickly emerging as one of the preeminent ukulele players of the next generation. Energy, fun, passion and pure hearts would best describe this dynamic ukulele duo.

 

 


fulare_pad [phonetically “flu-ry-pad”]: A ukulele-guitar duo in Japan, making the sound to take you on a free and easy journey of music. Their name is a combination of a Japanese word “furari” and an English word “pad” referred to as

 


John Atkins, aka “The Ukulele Teacher” from YouTube: The Ukulele Teacher’s YouTube channel boasts nearly 1,000,000 subscribers and over 300 lessons which attract in over three million views each month with a diverse mix of oldies, kids songs, and the very latest pop tunes. Grace Vanderwaal has credited John with inspiring her to play the ukulele.

 

 

For those interested, a starter Ohana ukulele can be purchased for only $119, which also includes entry into the festival.

 


2017 Los Angeles International Ukulele Festival 
tickets (includes workshops and performances) are $45; $20 students with ID at the door; free for kids 12 & under, and are available online at www.ukuleleisfun.com or call (800) 595-4849. The Torrance Cultural Arts Center is located at 3330 Civic Center Drive, Torrance, CA 90503.

 

 

#  #  #

 

Details for Calendar Listing
2017 Los Angeles International Ukulele Festival

 


Who:

Celebrating the little four-stringed wonder – the Ukulele – which has been captivating hearts and bringing musical joy into people’s lives for over 100 years, the 2017 Los Angeles International Ukulele Festival presented by Kala Koa Entertainment, is an exciting day-long event dedicated to exploring the musical versatility of the ukulele for the experienced ukulele player, the occasional strummer, or simply the curious spectator. The Festival includes workshops for all levels of playing ability to work on technique or simply learn to play, live all-star performances by some of today’s most popular ukulele players (included in admission), as well as a variety of vendors and popular Hawaiian food and beverage options (for purchase). The 2017 Los Angeles International Ukulele Festival is the only festival of its kind where one can enjoy all-star performances all-day by today’s hottest ukulele talent plus access to all the workshops.

 


Artists and Workshop Instructors:

Lil Rev; Victoria Vox; Honoka & Azita; fulare_padJohn Atkins, aka “The Ukulele Teacher” from YouTube; Cynthia LinFred SokolowMitch ChangUkulenny, MahealaniJody KamisatoKalei GamiaoKrista KupauMele Ohana; among others

 

 

When:             Saturday, September 30, 2017

9:30 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. (doors open at 8:30 a.m.)


Where:            Torrance Cultural Arts Center
                        3330 Civic Center Drive
Torrance, CA 90503


Tickets (Workshops & Performances): $45; $20 students with ID at the door; free for kids 12 & under


How/Information:
– www.ukuleleisfun.com(800) 595-4849
– https://www.facebook.com/kalakoa/; @kalakoa
– The Ukulele Festival on YouTube:


– Full Festival line-up http://kalakoa.com/ukulele/schedule.html

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Entertainment News

Gregg T. Daniel directs lyrical, uplifting ‘Home’ by Samm-Art Williams

LONG BEACH, Calif.— There’s no place like home – at least according to playwright Samm-Art Williams. First produced to great acclaim by the Negro Ensemble Company, Williams’ brilliantly inventive and lyrically expressive Home will run at International City Theatre from Oct. 20 through Nov. 5, directed by Gregg T. Daniel. Two low-priced previews take place on Oct. 18 and Oct. 19.

 

Donathan Walters (Bars and Measures, Colony Collapseat Theatre @ Boston Court) plays “prodigal son” Cephus Miles, an orphan who leaves his family’s farm in North Carolina to seek refuge and prosperity in the NorthLeilani Smith (NAACP Best Ensemble Award-winningFlyin’ West at ICT) and Angela K. Thomas (The Launch Prize at Bridge Repertory Theater in Cambridge, MA; A Raisin in the Sun at Trinity Repertory Company, Providence, RI) portray more than 25 characters over the course of Cephus’ epic journey from adolescence to adulthood, as he struggles to stay true to himself amid a rapidly changing and turbulent America. Spanning the 1950s through the Vietnam War and Civil Rights eras,heartbreaking hurdles and setbacks continuously obstruct his road to happiness. But Cephus perseveres and always manages to remain upbeat.

 

Williams, who was born in the small town of Burgaw, NC (population 1,700), was living on 47th Street in New York and the holidays were approaching when a longing for home inspired this play.

 

“The Vietnam War was raging at that particular time, so I wanted to do a positive play about a country character who was yearning for his home, as I was doing at Christmas,”

 

Williams said in an interview.

 

“I drew on my experience growing up in the country — plowing mules, cropping tobacco, bootleggers, going to church. The rest was my imagination. I wanted to do something that could be performed on the streets — I love street theater. And I wanted my character to have a conscience.”

“I saw the original Negro Ensemble Company production, and remember how it lit up Broadway — everybody was talking about it,”

 

says Daniel, who directed ICT’s multiple award-winning production of Fences.

 

Home is essentially a love story between two people, but also with the land and small town culture. Most important, it’s about learning to love oneself, about finding ‘home’ within us. When the characters finally learn to love themselves, they are able to accept the bounty and riches that have been given to them. It’s a beautiful voyage of discovery.”

 

The Negro Ensemble Company premiered Home at St. Mark’s Playhouse in 1979. The production subsequently transferred to Broadway’s Cort Theatre, where it received Tony Award and Drama Desk Award nomination for Best Play and garnered the Outer Critic’s Circle’s John Gassner Playwriting Award for Williams. Home was also the recipient of the NAACP Image Award and the North Carolina Governor’s Award.

 

Samm-Art Williams is a playwright, screenwriter, producer and actor. In addition to Home, the Negro Ensemble Company produced three other plays by him: A Love PlayWelcome to Black River; and Eyes of the American. Additional plays include Woman from the Town, Cork, Brass Birds Don’t Sing, Friends, In My Father’s House, Home the Musical, Conversations on a Dirt Road, The Dance on Widows’ Row, The Waiting Room and Revival. For the screen, Williams has written Solomon Northup’s Odyssey (PBS), John Henry (Showtime), Badges (CBS), and episodes for Cagney and Lacey, The New Mike Hammer, Miami Vice and other programs. Williams was co-executive producer of The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air (NBC) and Hangin’ with Mr. Cooper (ABC), executive producer of Martin (Fox) and Good News (UPN), and consulting producer of the Columbia Tri-Star talk show Vibe with host Sinbad. As a member of the Negro Ensemble Company’s Acting Repertory, he performed in The First Breeze of Summer (Broadway), Eden, Nevis Mountain Dew, No-Where to Run…No-Where to Hide, Old Phantoms and The Brownsville Raid, and he has had roles in the feature films Blood Simple and Huckleberry Finn, among others. His television acting credits include Women of Brewster Place, Race to the Pole and Search for Tomorrow. He has been nominated for two Emmy Awards and is the recipient of the Guggenheim Fellowship, the National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship for Playwriting, and the Roanoke Island Historical Association’s Morrison Award. He is currently Artist in Residence at North Carolina Central University.

 

The creative team for Home includes set designer Tesshi Nakagawa, lighting designer Stacy McKenney, costume designer Kim DeShazo, sound designer Jeff Polunas, props designers Patty and Gordon Briles, and hair and wigs designer Anthony Gagliardi. Casting is by Michael Donovan and the production stage manager is John H. Freeland, Jr.

 

Home runs ThursdaysFridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m., Oct. 20 through Nov. 5. Two preview performances take place on Wednesday, Oct. 18 and Thursday, Oct. 19, both at 8 p.m. Tickets are $47 on Thursdays and Fridays, and $49 on Saturdays and Sundays, except for Oct. 20 (opening night) for which tickets are $55 and include a post show reception at Utopia Restaurant. Low-priced tickets to previews are $35. International City Theatre has formed a community partnership with the African American community in Long Beach to raise funds for college scholarships and to bring students to the production. A Community Partnership Package, which includes a pre-performance Gala dinner as well as the post-show reception with the actors on opening night, is $125; tables of ten are available for $1,200. Community Partnership chairs: Dr. Sharon Valear RobinsonMarva Lewis and Stevi Meredith.

 

International City Theatre is located in the Long Beach Performing Arts Center at 330 East Seaside Way in Long Beach, CA 90802. For reservations and information, call 562-436-4610 or go to InternationalCityTheatre.org.

 

 
Details for Calendar Listings
Home
WHAT:
Home
 — Produced to great acclaim by the Negro Ensemble Company, Samm-Art Williams’ brilliantly inventive, lyrically expressive play deals joyfully with the coming of age of a young black man from rural South Carolina. Tony and Drama Desk Award nominations for Best Play.

 

WHO:
• Written by Samm-Art Williams
• Directed by Gregg T. Daniel
• Starring Leilani SmithAngela K. ThomasDonathan Walters
• Produced by caryn desai [sic] • Presented by International City Theatre

 

 
WHEN:
Previews: Oct. 18 and Oct. 19 at 8 p.m.
Performances: Oct. 20 – Nov. 5

• Wednesday at 8 p.m.: Oct. 18 (preview)
• Thursdays at 8 p.m.: Oct. 19 (preview), Oct. 26, Nov. 2
• Fridays at 8 p.m.: Oct. 20 (Opening Night), Oct. 27, Nov. 3
• Saturdays at 8 p.m.: Oct. 21, Oct. 28, Nov. 4
• Sundays at 2 p.m.: Oct. 22, Oct. 29, Nov. 5

 

WHERE:
INTERNATIONAL CITY THEATRE
Long Beach Performing Arts Center
330 East Seaside Way
Long Beach, CA 90802

 

HOW:
562-436-4610 or www.InternationalCityTheatre.org
• Visit us on facebook: www.facebook.com/ICTLongBeach/
• Follow us on twitter: @ICTLongBeach and instagram: @ICT_LongBeach

 

TICKETS:
• Opening Night (Aug. 25): $55 (includes post-show reception with the actors)
• Saturdays and Sundays: $49
• Thursdays and Friday (except Aug, 25): $47
• Previews: $35

 

“Home is about learning to love oneself, about finding ‘home’ within us. Click To Tweet

 

 

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Celebrity News

Latin Grammy Award-winner Vicente Amigo


Flamenco composer and virtuoso guitarist
returns to Los Angeles for one-night only


Wednesday, September 20 at 8:00 p.m.

Redondo Beach Performing Arts Center


LOS ANGELES- Latin Grammy Award-winning Flamenco composer and virtuoso guitarist, Vicente Amigo, known as one of the most dazzling Flamenco guitarists of his generation, returns to Los Angeles for one-night only at the Redondo Beach Performing Arts Center on Wednesday, September 20 at 8:00 p.m. Hailing from Córdoba, Spain, Amigo has toured the world receiving many of Spain’s most important awards and honors and is highly respected and admired for his artistic thirst and capacity for innovation and renovation.

 
Amigo’s litany of international accolade includes a Latin Grammy for Best Flamenco Album (2001), being named Best Guitar Player by Guitar Player Magazine (1993), and winning First Prize at the Flamenco Guitar International Contest (Badajoz 1988). He was nominated for two more Latin Grammy’s in 2006 and 2013 (each for Best Flamenco Album), and won the “Patriarch of Flamenco” Award at the 2010 Flamenco Summit.

 
Guitar Player Magazine has named Amigo the

 

“Best international Flamenco guitarist,”

 

while Pat Metheny has called Amigo

 

“The greatest guitarist alive.”

 

“Somewhere between poetry and commercial stardom, [Vicente Amigo] represents a new generation of flamenco artists,”

 

according to All About Jazz.

 
Performing in Amigo’s band are Rafael de Utrera, Vocals; Paquito Gonzalez, Cajón; Añil Fernandez, Second Guitar; Ewen Vernal, Bass; and dancer “El Choro“, Antonio Molina.

 
Amigo’s recording career over the last 30 years is no less impressive, releasing eight albums each embraced by the public and critics, selling hundreds of thousands of units worldwide: De mi Corazón al Aire (1991),Vivencias Imaginadas (1995), Poeta (1997), Latin Grammy-winning Ciudad de las Ideas (2000), Latin Grammy-nominated Un momento en el Sonido (2005), Paseo de Gracia (2009). Tierra (2013 Sony/BMG) emerged as Amigo’s most innovative and global release to date, was nominated for 2013 Latin Grammy. As his eighth studio record, Memoria de los Sentidos (2017 Sony/Legacy), Vicente Amigo is back to his traditional flamenco roots. In this album he has gathered the top active flamenco artists, as Potito, El Pele, Miguel Poveda, Pedro el Granaino, Niña Pastori and even Farruquito, with his incredible dance and “zapateao” on Vicente´s buleria.

 
Vicente Amigo has also collaborated with José Mercé, Camarón, Sting, Alejandro Sanz, Rosario, Carmen Linares, Manolo Sanlúcar, Khaled and Miguel Bosé, and boasts live performances with John McLaughlin, Al DiMeola and Milton Nascimento. He continues performing to audiences around the world including Argentina, Columbia, Finland, France, Germany, Holland, Italy, Japan, Portugal, Spain, Canada and the United States.

 
Tickets start at $25, and are available online at www.laflamencofestival.com or at the venue on the night of the concert, if tickets remain. The Redondo Beach Performing Arts Center is located at 1935 Manhattan Beach Blvd. in Redondo Beach, California 90278.

 

 

#  #  #

Details for Calendar Listing
Latin Grammy Award-winner Vicente Amigo

 


Who:

Latin Grammy Award-winning Flamenco composer and virtuoso guitarist, Vicente Amigo, known as one of the most dazzling Flamenco guitarists of his generation, returns to Los Angeles for one-night only. Hailing from Córdoba, Spain, Amigo has toured the world receiving many of Spain’s most important awards and honors and is highly respected and admired for his artistic thirst and capacity for innovation and renovation. Amigo’s recording career over the last 30 years is no less impressive, releasing eight albums each embraced by the public and critics, selling hundreds of thousands of units worldwide.


Artists:

Vicente Amigo, Lead Guitar

Rafael de Utrera, Vocals
Paquito Gonzalez, Cajón
Añil Fernandez, Second Guitar
Ewen Vernal, Bass
Antonio Molina “El Choro”, Dancer

When:             Wednesday, September 20, 2017 @ 8 p.m.


Where:            Redondo Beach Performing Arts Center
                        1935 Manhattan Beach Blvd.
Redondo Beach, CA 90278


Tickets: starting at $25


How/Information:
– www.laflamencofestival.com(800) 595-4849
– https://www.facebook.com/kalakoa/; @kalakoa
– https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8jhcz7004q8
– http://www.vicenteamigo.com

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For the Love of Felicia

For the Love of Felicia (Part 6)

While Felicia entered her home, Jessica waited outside with their baby boys. Even though there was no sign of Terrence’s car, that didn’t mean that he wasn’t parked around the corner; he had done that before. Felicia could only hope that he wasn’t there. Terrence has a tendency to have a temper if things were not going his way. Felicia not responding to him would most certainly be something not going his way.

As Felicia slowly walked inside, she called out for Terrence. “Terrence, are you here? Terrence…”

Even though she heard nothing, Felicia continued to look around her home. Her bedroom was the last place that she needed to check. About to breathe a sigh of relief as she was standing in her room, Terrence stepped out from the master bathroom, almost scaring her to death.

“Where the hell have you been?” Terrence yelled at the frightened Felicia.

Stuttering, Felicia barely responded, “I…I…I was out with Jessica. I stayed the night…”

Before Felicia could finish, Terrence lunged forward and slapped Felicia on the left side of her face. “Nah, you were out with another dude! There is no way you would ignore my calls if you were just with Jessica! I already told you about disrespecting me!” Terrence continued to yell, ignoring the fact that Felicia was crying and that the whole left side of her face was starting to puff up.

“Terrence, baby, you know I would never mess around on you! Baby, please! I promise you that I was with Jessica!” Felicia pleaded between tears.

“And where the hell is my son? I know you didn’t have him around someone else!” Terrence seemed to be ignoring everything that Felicia was saying to him.

“He is outside with Jessica. I will tell her to go so we can talk. Let me straighten this out with you!”

“Nah, go get my son and tell her to get on! She was probably helping you cheat on me. We both know how she feels about me!”

“Terrence, please! It would be better if it was just me and you here!”

“Alright, alright! Cuz, clearly, I need to make you understand how important it is to respect me!” Before Felicia could get out of the room, Terrence grabbed her by the neck, with both of his hands, applying enough pressure to make it difficult for her to breathe. “And you better not do anything crazy like call the police on me when you go out there! In fact, I will be right there with you! Let’s go!”

Terrence took Felicia by the arm and practically dragged her to the door. Not passing the threshold, Terrence waved to Jessica as he maintained his grip on Felicia’s arm. “Hey, Jessica, how are you doing?” he asked sounding genuinely interested.

Hesitantly, Jessica responded, “I’m good. Are you guys ok?”

“Yeah, girl,” said Felicia calmly, “you know we have some things to talk about, but we are good. Would you mind taking TJ back home with you? I can pick him up tomorrow, if that’s not a problem.”

“You know I got lil TJ. I got you too, Felicia. Just let me know!” Jessica exclaimed with a little edge to her voice this time. She wasn’t stupid and knew that something was wrong with her friend.

“We’re good, Jessica. I will call you later and come by tomorrow.”

Before Jessica could respond, Terrence pulled Felicia back into the house and shut the door. Felicia knew that the night was just getting started with Terrence. She didn’t know how much longer she could take his antics. If she survived the night, Felicia was finally going to have to do something for her and her son’s sake.

 

Terrence has a tendency to have a temper if things were not going his way. #FortheLoveofFelicia… Click To Tweet

 

Read For the Love of Felicia 1-5 HERE.

Written by Dani Powell, RM Entertainment Original Story Contributor

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Entertainment News

World premiere play ‘Runaway Home’ a poetic mother-daughter-tale set in wake of Hurricane Katrina

Sometimes what you’re searching for is right where you started. The Fountain Theatre presents a powerful, funny and deeply moving mother-daughter story by Jeremy J. Kamps. Multiple award-winning Shirley Jo Finney returns to the Fountain to direct the world premiere of Runaway Home for a Sept. 16 opening.

 

Three years after Hurricane Katrina, the unhealed wounds of New Orleans’ Lower 9th Ward continue to fester. Camille Spirlin(ABC’s American Koko, Fox TV’sRosewood, Nickelodeon’s Marvin Marvin) stars as 14-year-old runaway Kali. Rhyming, stealing and scamming her way through the still-destroyed neighborhood, she embarks on a journey to pick through the wreckage of what used to be her life. While the rest of the country’s attention drifts, the neighborhood’s residents are left to repair the damage from the inside out. As their attempts at renewal leave a path of destruction in their wake, Kali bears witness to what the floodwaters left behind. Also in the cast are Leith Burke (Citizen: An American Lyric at the Fountain, Neighbors at the Matrix), Jeris Lee Poindexter (The Darker Face of the Earth, Central Avenue, Gem of the Ocean at the Fountain),Armando Rey (Men on the Verge of a His-panic Breakdown at Macha Theatre), Maya Lynne Robinson (In the Red and Brown Water at the Fountain – LADCC Award, Best Ensemble), Brian Tichnell (Dream Catcher at the Fountain, HBOsSilicon Valley, L.A. Theatre Works’ national tour of The Graduate) and Karen Malina White (Citizen: An American Lyricand The Ballad of Emmett Till – Best Ensemble LADCC and Ovation Awards – at the Fountain, currently in As You Like Itat Antaeus).

 

“This play couldn’t be more timely,” says Fountain co-artistic director Stephen Sachs. “Hurricane Katrina may have ceased in 2005, but the storm of racism, poverty and class inequality rages on in our country to this day. We need look no further than Flint, Michigan, to see systemic government prejudice against citizens of color and the poor. But as Jeremy’s play so beautifully demonstrates, the bonds of family and community will weather any storm.”

 
When Kamps traveled to New Orleans two years after Katrina to volunteer “gutting and mucking” (stripping homes to the studs to remove mold), he had been teaching middle school in Connecticut. He already had an idea in his head about a runaway girl who collects other people’s garbage, finding meaning in the meaningless.

 

“Kali’s world paralleled the displacement, hope for renewal, fracture and resilience I was seeing in the social-political reality of the Lower 9th Ward,” he explains. “Whenever a character’s inner life and experience are so congruent with an important social issue, that’s the story I want to write.”

 
While in New Orleans, Kamps met Antoine, a man in his ‘70s who had just returned to what had been his family’s home for generations. Antoine was going from house to house trying to trace relatives, friends, acquaintances and neighbors, to find out what had happened to them in the years since the storm.

 

“His friendship helped me honor the stories of this community in a truthful way — to see the past, present and future of the Lower 9th through their eyes,”

 

says the playwright.

According to Finney,

 

“Because the media painted them as poor and impoverished, most people don’t realize that the residents of the Lower 9th were working class homeowners. Those homes had been in families for generations. Members of the community were expecting government funds so they could rebuild, but because of red tape and bureaucracy, the money never came, or it took so long that people had to end up using it for rent or just to eat.”

 

“The mother-daughter relationship becomes the pivotal heart space in this story about this community,” she continues. “The play is very funny because Kali is so spirited, but the rage, helplessness and loss that Kali and her mother share are the core of the play. That is the challenge they both struggle with to find their way back to each other and home. What happens to people when they aren’t seen, when they don’t feel safe? How do you begin to rebuild your life when nobody cares?”

 
Jeremy Kamps’s plays have received awards and recognition including the William Saroyan Human Rights Award Finalist (2016); Page 73 Semi-Finalist (2017); Ruby Lloyd Apsey Award (Gutting); The Goldberg Prize; Woodward International Playwriting (What It Means To Disappear Here); Hudson Valley Writers Center and the NYU Festival of New Works (Water Hyacinth). His play Breitwisch Farm will be produced by Esperance Theater Company in NYC later this year. Recent productions include Gutting, presented by the National Black Theatre of Harlem and What It Means To Disappear Here (Ugly Rhino, NYC). His work has been produced/developed with Esperance Theater Company, Company Cypher at the National Black Theatre of Harlem, Ugly Rhino, Dixon Place, Hudson Valley Shakespeare, The Amoralists and New York Theatre Workshop. His fiction has been published in The Madison Review and The Little Patuxent; has been honored with the H.E. Francis Award, the Howard/John Reid Fiction Prize and was a Lamar York Prize finalist; and has been recognized in Glimmertrain, Inkwell, The Caribbean Writer and New Millenium. He is a member of the Emerging Writers Group at the Public Theater. Also an educator and activist, Jeremy has lived and worked for lengthy periods of time in Latin America, India and East Africa, where he focused on support and empowerment for former child soldiers, displaced peoples and child rights. He recently received the Theatre Communications Group “On the Road” grant to return to Kenya where he conducted drama workshops as part of his research for a new play on flower farms. He has facilitated drama and writing workshops around the world and for all ages. He has an MFA in Dramatic Writing from NYU Tisch School of the Arts.

 

Shirley Jo Finney has previously directed acclaimed Fountain productions of Citizen: An American Lyric (selected for CTG’s first annual Block Party at the Kirk Douglas Theatre) The Brothers Size, In the Red and Brown Water (for which she earned her second Ovation award), Heart Song, The Ballad of Emmett TillYellowman, Central Avenue and From the Mississippi Delta.  Her work has been seen at the McCarter Theater, Pasadena Playhouse, Goodman Theater, Alabama Shakespeare Festival, Cleveland Playhouse, L.A. Theatre Works, Crossroads Theater Company, Actors Theater of Louisville Humana Festival, Mark Taper Forum, American College Theatre Festival, Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and at the State Theater in Pretoria, South Africa, where she helmed a critically acclaimed production of the South African opera, Winnie, based on the life of political icon Winnie Mandela. For television, she directed several episodes ofMoesha, and she garnered the International Black Filmmakers ‘Best Director’ Award for her short film, Remember Me.She is the recipient of the African American Film Marketplace Award of Achievement for Outstanding Performance and Achievement and leader in Entertainment.

 

The creative team for Runaway Home includes scenic designer Stephanie Kerley Schwartz, lighting designer Jennifer Edwards, composer/sound designer Peter Bayne, costume designer Naila Aladdin Sanders, props designer DeAnne Millais, choreographer Janet Roston and dialect coach Tyler Seiple. The production stage manager is Jessaica Shields; associate producer is James Bennett; and Stephen SachsSimon Levy and Deborah Lawlor produce for theFountain Theatre.

 

The Fountain Theatre is one of the most successful intimate theaters in Los Angeles, providing a creative home for multi-ethnic theater and dance artists. The Fountain has won over 225 awards, and Fountain projects have been seen across the U.S. and internationally. Recent highlights include being honored for its acclaimed 25th Anniversary Season in 2015 by Mayor Eric Garcetti and the Los Angeles City Council; the 2014 Ovation Award for Best Season and the 2014 BEST Award for overall excellence from the Biller Foundation; the inclusion of the Fountain’s Citizen: An American Lyric in Center Theatre Group’s upcoming Block Party at the Kirk Douglas Theatre; and the naming of seven Fountain productions in a row as “Critic’s Choice” in the Los Angeles Times. The Fountain’s most recent production, the world premiere of Building the Wall by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Robert Schenkkan, ran for five months and was named “L.A. hottest ticket” by the Los Angeles Times.

 

Runaway Home runs Sept. 16 through Nov. 5, with performances on Saturdays at 8 p.m.Sundays at 2 p.m.; andMondays at 8 p.m. (dark Monday, Sept. 18). Three preview performances take place on Wednesday, Sept. 13; Thursday, Sept. 14; and Friday, Sept. 15, all at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $20$40; every Monday is Pay-What-You-Want. The Fountain Theatre is located at 5060 Fountain Avenue (at Normandie) in Los Angeles. Secure, on-site parking is available for $5. The Fountain Theatre is air-conditioned and wheelchair accessible. For reservations and information, call (323) 663-1525 or go to www.FountainTheatre.com.

 

 
Details for Calendar Listings
Runaway Home
WHAT:
World premiere of Runaway Home — Three years after Hurricane Katrina, the unhealed wounds of New Orleans’ Lower 9th Ward continue to fester. In this powerful, funny and deeply moving mother-daughter story, 14-year-old runaway Kali embarks on a journey to pick through the wreckage of what used to be her life, rhyming, stealing and scamming her way through the still-destroyed neighborhood. While the rest of the country’s attention drifts, the community’s residents are left to repair the damage from the inside out. As their attempts at renewal leave a path of destruction in their wake, Kali bears witness to what the floodwaters left behind.

 

WHO: 
• Written byJeremy J. Kamps
• Directed by Shirley Jo Finney
• Starring Leith Burke, Jeris Lee Poindexter, Armando Rey, Maya Lynne Robinson, Camille Spirlin, Brian Tichnell,Karen Malina White
• Produced by Stephen SachsSimon Levy and Deborah Lawlor
• Presented by The Fountain Theatre

 

WHEN: 
Previews: Sept. 13, Sept. 14, Sept.15
Performances: Sept. 16 – Nov. 5
• Wednesday at 8 p.m.: Sept. 13 ONLY (preview)
• Thursday at 8 p.m.: Sept. 14 ONLY (preview)
• Friday at 8 p.m.: Sept. 15 ONLY (preview)
• Saturdays at 8 p.m.: Sept. 16 (opening night), 23, 30; Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28; Nov. 4
• Sundays at 2 p.m.: Sept. 17, 24; Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29; Nov. 5
• Mondays at 8 p.m.: Sept. 25; Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 (dark Sept. 18)

 

WHERE:
The Fountain Theatre
5060 Fountain Ave.
Los Angeles CA 90029
(Fountain at Normandie)

 

 
HOW:
(323) 663-1525 or www.FountainTheatre.com
• Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/TheFountainTheatre
• Follow us on Twitter: @fountaintheatre
• Instagram: https://instagram.com/fountaintheatre/

 

TICKET PRICES:
$20 – $40:
• Premium Seating: $40
• Regular Seating: $35 
• Seniors 65 or older: $27 (regular seating only)
• Students: $20 (valid ID required)
• RUSH: $20 (at the door, 15 mins prior to curtain, subject to availability)
• Monday nights: Pay-What-You-Want 

 

PARKING:
Secure, on-site parking: $5

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